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  1. #11
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Yep, even though I "know" that I've done exposure and processing properly, it still is a relief when I can see the images, and know that evil spirits haven't snatched away my pictures!

    A couple of hints: If you're loading the tank in the dark, that is without a changing bag! put all the required gubbins in a confined space, such as a 11x14 processing tray or a plastic dish pan. This keeps everything together. Trying to find something like the tank lid in the dark is no fun. Even a small counter seems huge in the dark. And if the lid falls on the floor....

    This same tray or dishpan helps confine spills or leaks from tanks. Speeds cleanup.

    BTW, St Ansel, He of the Adams clan, recommends wood spring closepins over the fancy metal (and much, much more expensive) metal negative clips for drying. He notes that the wood grips the wet, slippery negatives very well, and that the wood is less likely to scratch the film. This from the Sacred Text of St Ansel, The Negative. Seriously, I've used the pins for years 'cause I'm basically cheap, er, ah, economical. Always nice to be justified.

    More seriously, I'd suggest mixing the developer, at least, with distilled or deionized water. Tap water, while potable and safe, may contain particulate matter you don't want on your film. Certainly dilute your Photo-Flo with distilled water. I once had a printing session wrecked by the tap water, it turned out that the water department was flushing the pipes with a dilute acid. Just like stop bath, and it deactivated my Dektol. It cost me a little printing paper, but had I diluted D-76 1 to 1...I'd have lost negatives.

    Now a question for the group. My Paterson tank in addition to a little leaking, doesn't like to have the lid screwed on. This is not happy in the dark! My stainless steel tank leak a bit, and the top and the little cap can be hard to get off. I wonder if silicone grease smeared very sparingly on the threads might help. This is the stuff used in swimming pool filter threads, it is stable to temperatures far past pool or photo use. I suspect the only risk would be in getting it on the film.

  2. #12

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    Thanks for the input! Yeah, Molli, I ended up spending $18 on a special tool and I should have bought a simple bottle opener as you did...I think it would have been simpler. As for the scanner, my purposes for scanning are to post my images on the web rather than archival purposes and after the chorus of "horrible scans" I got when I posted my first roll (that I had processed because it's color) I realized I probably made a mistake with choosing to go with a cheaper scanner rather than spend what is necessary and get something like an epson V600 (which is what I'm looking at.) I did use the aforementioned cheap scanner to scan in my images from the roll..here are a few samples which I did some adjustments in, in lightroom (as requested ) Note that there were some water spotting issues so I'm going to order the photo-flo.
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  3. #13
    Peltigera's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GRHazelton View Post
    A couple of hints: If you're loading the tank in the dark, that is without a changing bag! put all the required gubbins in a confined space, such as a 11x14 processing tray or a plastic dish pan. This keeps everything together. Trying to find something like the tank lid in the dark is no fun. Even a small counter seems huge in the dark. And if the lid falls on the floor....
    Same applies if you are using a changing bag like I do. If it is not in the bag, you cannot use it - like the lid to the tank.

  4. #14
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    35mm? The tool I use to open the canister is a simple bottle opener. In the dark, of course.

    In the old days, before they affixed the end caps on securely, we just took the cartridge in our hand, with the longer end of the spool facing down, and pressed hard on the countertop. The top end cap would pop off and the film was free, and you could reassemble the cartridge to use with bulk film. I miss the old Ilford cartridges where you could do this, actually, although you don't want to drop them on a hard surface in the light.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  5. #15
    Ken Nadvornick's Avatar
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    Hey! Those are pretty good for a first effort. Better than mine were, as I recall from long ago. Congratulations again. And thanks for posting.

    Regarding scan quality - no worries. Believe me, everyone here is VERY good at making the mental adjustments required. We all know a scan is not a real print or a real negative or a real transparency. It's a virtual reproduction. And reproductions are never perfect. Most of us, especially those who don't bother calibrating our colorspaces and monitors because that's not why we're here or what we're after, can make the jump.

    Ken
    "They are the proof that something was there and no longer is. Like a stain. And the stillness of them is boggling. You can turn away but when you come back they’ll still be there looking at you."

    — Diane Arbus, March 15, 1971, in response to a request for a brief statement about photographs

  6. #16

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    Thank you so much Ken! Yeah Jim...that was my mistake, buying a fancy tool

  7. #17

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    You can thank the invention of high speed auto-winders for 'crimped' cassette bodies ( they stressed cassette bodies so much that on rare occasions they 'pinged' ) before that a tap on the darkroom bench was sufficient......but we do sell a purpose designed very nice cassette opener....most bottle openers should work as well.

    Congrats on your processing efforts....

    Simon ILFORD photo / HARMAN technology Limited

  8. #18
    GRHazelton's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon R Galley View Post
    You can thank the invention of high speed auto-winders for 'crimped' cassette bodies ( they stressed cassette bodies so much that on rare occasions they 'pinged' ) before that a tap on the darkroom bench was sufficient......but we do sell a purpose designed very nice cassette opener....most bottle openers should work as well.

    Congrats on your processing efforts....

    Simon ILFORD photo / HARMAN technology Limited
    So that's the reason. As a cynic I'd long assumed it was merely an effort to discourage bulk film loading.

  9. #19
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    I had an Ilford end cap pop off when I opened a roll of film, too. I handled it a bit too roughly I suppose. (No compensation needed, Simon; this was in the early 1980s!)

    I doubt Ilford would care if you used their cartridges for bulk film, especially if you bought their film to bulk load. You're saving them some manufacturing expense, after all, which is why you're paying less.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  10. #20
    D1v1d's Avatar
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    i'm smiling! Hope you keep going! Do post some scans!
    David Smith
    London, UK
    email: dasmith.uk@gmail.com
    Flickr: D1v1d
    Twitter: D1v1d

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