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  1. #1
    NDP_2010's Avatar
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    Agfa Orthochromatic line film

    I just purchased some agfa orthochromatic line film off the internet (http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/110808928...84.m1423.l2649) ,
    just wondering if anyone has any experience with this film; I am hoping to cut it up and use in 4x5 camera and develop in conventional b/w chemistry. Since searching google several times did not give many results I thought I would ask here.
    From what I read duplicating film is slow speed (iso 1?)
    Any other advice or experiences would be appreciated.

    thanks
    pentax 6x7,canon eos 300, crown graphic 4x5

  2. #2
    dances_w_clouds's Avatar
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    http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/1...mendation.html

    AGFA film. That film I usually shoot it @ 25 iso

  3. #3
    NDP_2010's Avatar
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    Oh, I didnt realise it was the same film thanks.
    pentax 6x7,canon eos 300, crown graphic 4x5

  4. #4
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    You might want to check into this film's characteristics a little further. Orthochromatic line film usually means Ortho Litho film. I've used ortho litho films by manufacturers other than Agfa. They are about the speed of printing paper, or slower. They are designed for half tone work, in other words pure black and pure white with no shades of gray. These films can be processed to give more or less continuous tones using slow working low contrast developers similar to those used for microfilm. Diluted print developer is often recommended for ortho litho film for continuous tones, but I've never had good luck with it. The images come up too fast, resulting in uneven development and excessively high contrast.
    Happiness is a load of bulk chemicals, a handful of recipes, a brick of film and a box of paper. - desertrat

  5. #5
    NDP_2010's Avatar
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    thanks for the info. For the price I should be able to spare a few sheets for testing
    pentax 6x7,canon eos 300, crown graphic 4x5



 

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