Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,678   Posts: 1,482,108   Online: 879
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Chicago, Western Suburbs
    Shooter
    4x5 Format
    Posts
    1,423
    Dear epp,

    I can only compare Kentmere 400 with HP5+ at box speed and in 35mm. Kentmere 400 is clearly "grainier" than HP5+ (a film I think should get more credit for it's fine grain look to my eye at least), but it takes a lovely photo. Try some, it's certainly priced attractively.

    Neal Wydra

  2. #12
    Jerevan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sweden
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,810
    Images
    9
    My tongue-in-cheek take on this: a lot of people buy 2 rolls of a given film, shoot it off and develop it in a haphazard way in some whatever-developer, and then write on forums saying "oh this is not like the Tri-X that I have used for 20 years, blah, blah..." Or the other way around, "the best thing since Ansel Adams crawled out of the cradle". You need to shoot a good bit of a film and keep at it for a while to see if it works for you. And the negative is only the beginning...

    For me, both K100 and 400 are really good films, with Ilford QC, at a very nice price.
    “Do your work, then step back. The only path to serenity.” - Lao Tzu

  3. #13
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,985
    Images
    279
    I can only agree with this. Paper/developer and film/developer is a system, where if you replace one piece, something else has to be adjusted to get back to a place where you have results that you like again.
    To recognize the difference, to learn how to deal with the difference, and to learn how to use new materials takes a lot more effort than most people are willing to put up with.

    You must give a new film some time and practice, explore its limitations and strengths, before you really know what it's capable of. Pushed to their limits, just about any film and developer combination can be made to work very well. The key isn't really in WHAT we use, but in HOW we use it. HOW we use our materials have a far greater effect on the outcome than the small differences between the materials. I have proven this to myself time and again when I get tempted to try something I haven't tried before, and when I end up with prints that look pretty much like the other ones, I always end up wondering whether it was worth the effort or not.


    Quote Originally Posted by Jerevan View Post
    My tongue-in-cheek take on this: a lot of people buy 2 rolls of a given film, shoot it off and develop it in a haphazard way in some whatever-developer, and then write on forums saying "oh this is not like the Tri-X that I have used for 20 years, blah, blah..." Or the other way around, "the best thing since Ansel Adams crawled out of the cradle". You need to shoot a good bit of a film and keep at it for a while to see if it works for you. And the negative is only the beginning...

    For me, both K100 and 400 are really good films, with Ilford QC, at a very nice price.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #14
    sandermarijn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Leiden, Netherlands
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    771
    Images
    11
    You're so right Jerevan. More than once have I been one of those people who try two, three, four films and then jump to conclusions straight away. Worse, sometimes I even talk about films I haven't even tried myself! How silly can you be?

    I've been wanting to try Kentmere films for a while but have too many other films lying around still. If Kentmere 400 is a grittier HP5+ then I may actually come to like it. Usually I prefer regular fine grain (Neopan 400 type), but not always.

  5. #15
    piu58's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Leipzig, Germany
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    555
    > If Kentmere 400 is a grittier HP5+

    This depends much on development. A first try will not show that exactely.

    I usesd a PQ developer for K100,400 which workes fine.
    ---
    Uwe Pilz

  6. #16
    epp
    epp is offline
    epp's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Shooter
    Holga
    Posts
    68
    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    Dear epp,

    I can only compare Kentmere 400 with HP5+ at box speed and in 35mm. Kentmere 400 is clearly "grainier" than HP5+ (a film I think should get more credit for it's fine grain look to my eye at least), but it takes a lovely photo. Try some, it's certainly priced attractively.

    Neal Wydra
    I bought a roll of 35mm, 400 speed Kentmere. I plan on trying it soon.

    Thank you all for the replies/opinions.
    --
    My Holgas:

    Holga 120N
    Holga 120TLR
    Holga 135
    Holga 135TLR
    Holga 135 Pan

  7. #17

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,737
    Dear Nick,

    The KENTMERE emulsions are entirely new emulsions not based on any previous ILFORD emulsions.

    Simon. ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin