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Thread: D76

  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    Actually as a general rule, developers which give the same H&D curves at the same dilution, development time and temperature will generally be virtually identical for grain and sharpness.
    PE
    I'm kind of surprised by this statement. Or maybe not. Not sure.

  2. #52
    Zathras's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DarkroomDan View Post
    No it isn't. It is yellow with blue added.
    No way,

    It is WHITE with red and blue SUBTRACTED!!!
    When the chips are down,

    The buffalo is empty!!!



  3. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael R 1974 View Post
    I'm kind of surprised by this statement. Or maybe not. Not sure.
    I'll have to emphasize a phrase in that last post of mine a bit. I was not clear and you have taken this out of context.

    I did say "for developers that are intended to have the same formula" so the example here would be the published vs the pre-packed versions of D76. Obviously Xtol and HC110 can give the same H&D curve as D76, but they would not be at the same times or dilutions. And, the grain and sharpness would be different, but then they have radically different formulas from D76.

    PE

  4. #54

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    Understood. That's what I figured you meant. Sorry for the confusion.

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i have never used d76 so i don't even know why one uses it
    I've never* used anything else so I don't even know why not.

    *Really, I have used other developers, but I can count the times...

    -T-Max. Once. Still have 3/4 bottle.
    -Microdol-X. At least I thought about using it. I still have a bag.
    -Technidol with Technical Pan. I don't know though... the box still has three bottles.
    -XR-1. Or maybe I just brought home the data sheet for it.
    -Pint-sized Reversal kits to make B&W slides from Panatomic-X. This was about the same time I switched from Paterson tanks to steel tanks because 16 ounces doesn't cover two 35mm rolls.
    -E-6 a few times.
    -This doesn't count Rapid Access developers during years of graphic arts prepress work - that would throw off the statistics unfairly.

    p.s. I work for Kodak but the opinions and positions I take are my own and not necessarily those of EKC.

  6. #56

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    I did use D-76, honestly, it was just ok, not that great one, comparing it to Ilfosol 3 and TMAX for some films i developed i don't make that D-76 as top choice, don't get me wrong, it is a good developer but i don't get impressed with the results out of D-76 as i do with TMAX and Ilfosol 3, and i started to use HC-110, i will use it later for normal exposure i mean no pull/push and see how will be the results.

    Bottom line, D-76 is an easy developer as it is a standard one, and it will give great results for sure, but i don't state that it is the best one so far, i used 1G and 1L of D-76 and i got results with few films but only 1 or 2 was decent great, with TMAX i got all films decent amazing, with Ilfosol 3 i've got about 98$ decent results as i want.

  7. #57

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    All developers have compromises. They try to balance film speed, contrast, grain, cost, toxicity, keeping properties, and a bunch of other stuff. D-76 happens to be an extremely good compromise, giving high speed, fine grain, decent sharpness, reasonable keeping properties and capacity, acceptable toxicity, and low cost. In addition, it has worked well will all films from all manufacturers. You can easily find developers that give finer grain or higher sharpness, but not usually both together (Xtol?, DD-X?). Pyro developers may give somewhat nicer gradation, but at the cost of toxicity and short life. The reason for D-76's survival is that it does everything well, and, for most people and purposes, its particular combination of doing things well is better than whatever else is around.

  8. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    All developers have compromises. They try to balance film speed, contrast, grain, cost, toxicity, keeping properties, and a bunch of other stuff. D-76 happens to be an extremely good compromise, giving high speed, fine grain, decent sharpness, reasonable keeping properties and capacity, acceptable toxicity, and low cost. In addition, it has worked well will all films from all manufacturers. You can easily find developers that give finer grain or higher sharpness, but not usually both together (Xtol?, DD-X?). Pyro developers may give somewhat nicer gradation, but at the cost of toxicity and short life. The reason for D-76's survival is that it does everything well, and, for most people and purposes, its particular combination of doing things well is better than whatever else is around.
    OK, it is like balancing all factors, and maybe this is why i chose it if i don't know what look i want or how to develop certain film, but when i develop some films with different developers i may go sometimes with finer grain frames and another times i prefer sharper or say higher contrast, often i may want just normal standard one, but seems most what i shoot is either high contrast subjects or i keep going with lowest ISO as i can [50-100], so when i feel my negs are not that finest grain or not contrast enough then i blame D-76, but knowing the characteristic of each developer and film will help much to understand which combination to use.

    In fact, i started to list film by film with which best result i've got for different developer, i don't care to use 10 different developers with 10 different films if each combo will give me the look/result i want, but as someone told me is that experimenting a lot is kind of wasting time, and also not have some tests will not make it final, but he said it is better to settle with best combo you can get rather than trying more and going up/down up/down with results, 4 films i am done having best dev to me[not necessary for you] and i am moving to have another more to be settles with at least 6-8, i know 1-2 will be enough, but i can never tell when one certain film will be discontinued, so i must have some backups.

  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by ...but as someone told me is that experimenting a lot is kind of wasting time, and also not have some tests will not make it final, but he said it is better to settle with best combo you can get rather than trying more and going up/down up/down with results, 4 films i am done having best dev to me[not necessary for you
    and i am moving to have another more to be settles with at least 6-8, i know 1-2 will be enough, but i can never tell when one certain film will be discontinued, so i must have some backups.
    Experimenting isn't an entire waste of time, and it can be fun, but it does take time and concentration away from productive picture taking. The idea on standardizing on one developer and one film is a good one, but one film doesn't always work for all situations. A good general purpose developer like D-76 will get you excellent negatives for almost all situations. If you buy developer rather than mixing your own, a more modern formulation like Xtol may be somewhat superior.

    Grain is often something worry a lot about. They shouldn't. Grain is mostly a property of the film, but even very high speed films have very fine grain these days. The developer can effect the appearance but not the amount of grain. Fine-grain developers like D-76 and D-23 produce developed grains that are somewhat mushy in appearance, and that hides the grain to some extent. High acutance developers like Rodinal develop the grains sharply, so they may be apparent on close examination, but they will not detract from the overall picture with modern films.

    The advantage of a good general purpose developer like D-76 is that it works well with all films. You can standardize on it for all the films you commonly use. A small experiment may be in order. Choose a couple of standard developers - maybe D-76 and Xtol. Develop a couple of rolls each of the two films you use most in each of them. Look at the results, and decide on which developer pleases you the most on the average. That's the one you should standardize on. As you gain experience with it, your results will probably improve a bit.

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