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  1. #1
    OMU
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    Sodium sulfite desiccated" or "Sodium sulfite anhydrous

    Hello,
    I would like to play with some a amidoll paper developer.

    There are different recepies;
    unblinkingeye.com/Articles/Amidol/amidol.html

    Some with "Sodium sulfite desiccated" and some with "Sodium sulfite anhydrous.

    I hope anyone can tell me the differense about those cemicals. I have the anhydrous, can I use it instead of the desiccated?

    Thanks :-)

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    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    They are the same - both mean no water, the other form which really only appears in US publications is Crystalline (cryst) which is the heptahydrate form.

    Ian

  3. #3
    OMU
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    Thanks Ian,
    Can I use the same weight for both of them, (sorry for my English )

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    Hello,
    Sodiumsulfite cryst. has 7 moles of crystal water and the molecular weight of 252, the anhydrous form has a molecular weight of 126. So you can take either 1 gr. Sodiumsulfite sicc. or 2 gr. of the crystalline form. The anhydrous form is much more stable at air, so the crystalline salt is virtually not available on the market. Sicc. is Latin and means "siccum" = dry.

  5. #5
    PhotoJim's Avatar
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    "Dessicated", when it comes to chemicals, is an obsolete term that has now been replaced by "anhydrous". Both mean the same thing - without water molecules.
    Jim MacKenzie - Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

    A bunch of Nikons; Feds, Zorkis and a Kiev; Pentax 67-II (inherited from my deceased father-in-law); Bronica SQ-A; and a nice Shen Hao 4x5 field camera with 3 decent lenses that needs to be taken outside more. Oh, and as of mid-2012, one of those bodies we don't talk about here.

    Favourite film: do I need to pick only one?

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by OMU View Post
    Thanks Ian,
    Can I use the same weight for both of them, (sorry for my English )
    Yes, they are the same chemical just a different term meaning the same thing.

    Ian



 

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