Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 70,211   Posts: 1,531,999   Online: 1172
      
Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    Andre Noble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Beverly Hills, CA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    220

    Wax Coating of Toned Fiber B&W Prints for Maximum Archival?

    Near the 1:30 mark of this You Tube video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yyWx-QrtNXk from Digital Silver Imaging they mention using a final wax coating on their custom fiber prints.

    Never heard of it (the wax). What's your opinion?
    Andre Noble, Beverly Hills California http://andrenoble.com/

  2. #2
    Mustafa Umut Sarac's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    İstanbul - Türkiye
    Shooter
    35mm RF
    Posts
    3,802
    Images
    108
    Wax would collect any dust and dirt and it will be off with rubbing ,
    is that bees wax ?

    Umut

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,769
    As I understand it the wax or varnish is used to increase the contrast of a matte print and does very little, if anything, to actually protect the print. Ansel Adams in his book The Print describes the use of lithographer's varnish. I have done this in the past and the contrast and overall appearence of the print improves. Actually very little varnish is left on the print so there is nothimg to collect dust.

    Any wax applied to a print should be a hard wax like carnauba and not a soft wax like beeswax.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 07-10-2012 at 07:12 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Dunedin,New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    269
    I have experimented with a product called Renaissance Wax -described as a "micro-crystalline wax polish".
    Refined waxes blended to a formula used by the British Museum and restoration specialists internationally to revive and protect valuable furniture,leather,paintings,metals,marble,ivory etc.

    Apply sparingly with soft cloth and buff gently. Dries hard instantly. Resists spillage. Does not show finger marks.

    All that's printed on the tin. I use it for prints that will be displayed,unprotected by glass.
    Several years on - no adverse affects noted.

  5. #5
    DarkroomDan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Enumclaw, WA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    239
    Images
    22
    I, also, have used Renaissance Wax. I tried several coats on a few palladium prints on Arches Platine and on Bienfang Graphics 360 that had been dry mounted to a heavier paper. In each case there was a slight increase in apparent d-max and a very slight sheen. I also tried it on some lith prints that were on a semi-gloss paper. Again, there was a very slight increase in the gloss - not all that much different than what one would see after buffing the print with a very soft cloth. I did this 3 or 4 years ago and I don't see any adverse effects.

    Dan

    I hadn't considered it but I like Smudger's idea of using it on prints to be displayed without glass.
    Daniel Williams
    Enumclaw WA USA

  6. #6
    Andre Noble's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Beverly Hills, CA
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    220
    The wax in question (see 1:30 in video) is liquid, in tank. Print dipped into.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Dunedin,New Zealand
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    269
    I agree with Darkroom Dan on this -the effect is subtle,by no means a panacea.By which I mean a print with poor D-Max won't be saved - Small effect,but just noticeable. Atmospheric crud wipes clean without effort (fly specks for example).
    I'm rather reassured by this - I'd rather show a print than hide it in a box because I can't afford to glass and frame it.
    Excellent on silverware too ,which I guess is what silver/gelatin is anyway..

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    West Sussex, UK.
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    17
    Images
    8
    Quote Originally Posted by Andre Noble View Post
    The wax in question (see 1:30 in video) is liquid, in tank. Print dipped into.
    I viewed that differently, that looks like a shot of the photo's in an archival washer to me ?

  9. #9
    holmburgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Rochester NY (native KS)
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,418
    Images
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by GuyS. View Post
    I viewed that differently, that looks like a shot of the photo's in an archival washer to me ?
    Yeah, that's an archival washer full of water, and they just happen to mention a wax varnish at the same time. Just a coincidence.
    If you are the big tree, we are the small axe



 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin