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  1. #11
    gainer's Avatar
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    Clay got it.

    I don't want to confuse you with facts, but in the process of experimenting with bleach and redevelop, you may want to try hydroquinone. Without sulfite, it produces a stain and relief image. Since development is to be carried to completion anyway, a very simple concoction of 1 teaspoon of hydroquinone and 1 teaspoon of sodium carbonate in 1/2 liter of water will do. There can be no more grain or fog than there was to start with. The color of the stain may not be ideal for some, but it's worth a try. Of course, catechol (AKA pyrocatechin) is good as well, but more expensive, and most of us will have some hydroquinone on hand. In any case, use the redeveloper very soon after mixing it.
    Gadget Gainer

  2. #12

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    Let me add a note about the bleach and redevelop procedure mentioned above...

    I have found that it can cause a much higher B+F stain than you might expect from the developer otherwise, so you will need to be careful that you do not make a negative that has so much B+F stain that it is very difficult to print with alternative processes. If you aren't printing with alternative processes, it's probably nothing to be concerned about.

    Also, this procedure will do nothing useful for an underexposed negative, only for a negative that has full shadow detail to begin with, but isn't contrasty enough for the process you like.

    You can also bleach and redevelop a negative that was originally developed in a staining developer, but the stain response will be very strong, so I would think twice about doing this without extensive testing beforehand.


    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

  3. #13
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    Of course it is true of any intensification that it cannot intensify what is not there. I have seen some negatives that looked as if there was nothing in the shadows that showed detail after intensification. You have seen, I'm sure, negatives in which you could only see a positive image by reflected light at just the right angle of incidence. That is a sign of drastic underdevelopment, which can be helped by intensification.

    It is true that whatever base fog is in the negative will be stained. That is not often a problem in underdeveloped negatives I have seen. "Extensive testing" is a bit of an exaggeration, IMHO. One test should do it. I often have a whole roll that was underdeveloped of which only a few are worth saving. One of the unworthy ones is sacrificed for the good of the worthy.
    Gadget Gainer

  4. #14

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    Gainer, I get the impression that you don't print with alternative processes.

    As I said in my original post, it is easy to dismiss the B+F buildup if you are printing silver, but if you are printing with an alternative process, you have the be careful that your results are suitable due to the extremely low sensitivity of many of the alternative processes.

    When I mentioned extensive testing, I was specifically talking about bleach and redevelop of previously stained negatives. The UV B+F of these negatives can shoot very high without much effort when using the bleach and redevelop approach. I personally wouldn't throw a negative I cared about into the soup until I have tested and printed a few different A:B:H2O mixes to determine which one will produce a reasonable result for the printing process that I intend the negative to be printed with.

    Of course, if anyone wants to be cavalier with their negatives, that's their business.

    ---Michael
    www.mutmansky.com
    B&W photography in Silver, Palladium, and gum bichromate.

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