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Thread: Polypan F

  1. #31
    georg16nik's Avatar
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    What Murray suggested
    covering the pressure plate with 120 backing paper
    sounds ok.
    How You are gonna do it depends on Your camera specifics etc.. You might not need it.

    I am shooting Polypan F with hood and filters 99% of the time, non-coated lenses, screwmount Leicas., they got kinda glossy pressure plates. No experiences with flare/glow yet but I don't shoot reflective stuff either, so can't say how much of it should You expect.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    However, the fact that cellulose acetate irreversibly degrade after ~ 50 years @ 65°F (18°C) and 50% relative humidity, release acetic acid and shrink in advanced stage as much as 10% is not big deal for some folks...
    If I am not mistaken, all consumer films in format 135 or 120 by Kodak, Ilford, Fuji and some others are cellulose acetate.
    Looks like the safety of auto-everything's plastic cameras more important than images.
    Early acetate based films may be subject to degradation vinegarization but there have been substantial improvements. I have negatives that are well over 50 years of age that do not show any problems. These were stored at ambiant temperature in Florida with high humity and high temperature. If by consumer films you mean amateur films then may I point out that professional films in the mentiooned formats are also on acetate.

    Many of the comments on this thread appear to be merely an attempt to gain validation. They say more about the buyer than they do of the film. The fact remains that this film was not designed for general purose use. It has its own limitations and I find it dishonest for companies to sell it (and other films) as a still camera film. I also find the name Polypan F an egregious attempt to confuse the public into thinking that this film is made by Ilford.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-15-2012 at 12:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

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  3. #33
    georg16nik's Avatar
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    All the scientific data on cellulose acetate doesn't apply to Your negatives
    The library of congress had to know better..

    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Early acetate based films may be subject to degradation vinegarization but there have been substantial improvements. I have negatives that are well over 50 years of age that do not show any problems. These were stored at ambiant temperature in Florida with high humity and high temperature. If by consumer films you mean amateur films then may I point out that professional films in the mentiooned formats are also on acetate.

    Many of the comments on this thread appear to be merely an attempt to gain validation. They say more about the buyer than they do of the film. The fact remains that this film was not designed for general purose use. It has its own limitations and I find it dishonest for companies to sell it (and other films) as a still camera film. I also find the name Polypan F an egregious attempt to confuse the public into thinking that this film is made by Ilford.

  4. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    All the scientific data on cellulose acetate doesn't apply to Your negatives
    The library of congress had to know better..
    The requirements of the Library of Congress are very, very convervative, in some cases in excess or 200 years. I submitted some of empirical data that acetate films stored under adverse conditions for over 50 years show no degradation. In fact some of the negaives in my files are over 70 years old. I am sure that there are other members that have had similar observations. As i said there have been improvements in the manufacture of acetate fim base that slow vinegarization. Eliminating all films on an acetate base would mean giving up such favorites as Tri-X and FP4+.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-15-2012 at 02:13 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #35
    georg16nik's Avatar
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    In Europe, the archival standards are the same.
    Only PET is considered archival. No one is archiving on cellulose acetate.

  6. #36
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    Actaully, the glow without an Anti-Halation layer, PLUS adding a "shiny" pressure plate, and you get an almost "IR" feel to it...
    Sure, I blew out the highlights a little here, and the shiney backing plate really added to it, but the effect is almost like an IR HALO, but not quite.

    I liked the look, but it isn't for everyone, and thats why some that shoot IR don't use AURA

    Click image for larger version. 

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    APS, 35mm, 120, 4x5 and a Deardorff & Sons 4x5 Special under restoration.

    I don't care the format, as long as it's film!

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  7. #37

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    i have seen terrible results with just ever film made,
    i don't think polypan f is the only film that can produce bad images.
    i think it is a concerted effort between the photographer, his camera
    and processing techniques as well as the film ...

    buy it if you want, have fun.

    john

  8. #38
    mikendawn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    i have seen terrible results with just ever film made,
    i don't think polypan f is the only film that can produce bad images.
    i think it is a concerted effort between the photographer, his camera
    and processing techniques as well as the film ...

    buy it if you want, have fun.

    john
    I guess that's not much different than seeing terrible results with a Leica...
    The film does not a photograph make... just like the camera...

    If you can't use either, you can't use either..

    of course if you're Chuck Norris, time just stands still for you...
    --------------------------------

    APS, 35mm, 120, 4x5 and a Deardorff & Sons 4x5 Special under restoration.

    I don't care the format, as long as it's film!

    Flickr Pages - Here

    Blogs - Here and Here

  9. #39
    georg16nik's Avatar
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    Some Polypan in Rodinal 1+50


  10. #40
    baachitraka's Avatar
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    These examples should not create any more doubts about this film...

    Quote Originally Posted by georg16nik View Post
    Some Polypan in Rodinal 1+50

    OM-1n: Do I need to own a Leica?
    Rolleicord Va: Humble.
    Holga 120GFN: Amazingly simple yet it produces outstanding negatives to print.

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