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Thread: Polypan F

  1. #41

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    Nice work there with Rodinal!

    Anyone got any samples with D76/X-TOL or anything in that line?

    (I got a full 90 meter roll of this one in my fridge, not yet opened).
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  2. #42
    thicktheo's Avatar
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    Polypan F in Rodinal 1:50 :










    Polypan F in Diafine :


  3. #43
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    A great film. If it's interesting images you are after and not just 'test' shots or something, this stuff is a great buy.

  4. #44

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    I love this film. I use either HC110 B for 10.5 minutes or TD3 full stand for 2.5 hours. Great.

  5. #45

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    Polypan Experiment...

    Hi, all!

    Well, for about £30 I landed a tin of Polypan from Germany - I had read all these threads and more and trawled for as many images and reviews as I could find. I really don't know why I went to such effort as, even at £30 (€35?), how could I go wrong?

    I have only used a few rolls of this film in my Leica M6 with a Voigtlander Nokton 40mm f1.4. I also have a beautiful and very under appreciated Jupiter 8 50mm f2 which I LOVE! The results so far are really very encouraging! I estimate that I may be able to roll out up to 60 rolls of 24 exposure films... maybe many more!? I have recently moved from SLR (Nikon FM2N + 50mm f1.8) to rangefinder.

    I'll try to attach some examples here (fingers crossed as it's my first ever post here!). I guess I need to play around with development times and dilution ratios, but in truth, I feel this is going to be a very forgiving film indeed! Some of my shots are either a wee bit underexposed or I'm in need of slightly longer development time!? Either way, I think these shots demonstrate that Polypan is, indeed, more than worth £30 for over 60 rolls of film - 50p a roll!!??!!?? It's what we call a 'no-brainer'... Bear in mind, I'm no professional and the results are more than pleasing for my level of skill.

    I use Ilford & Rodinal developers and Ilford Stop & Fixer. These are fine for me. Images are then scanned with an Epson V350 Perfection.

    The only problem I've encountered is this. I use an Agfa Rondinax for developing the negatives. This is a fantastic unit at least 40 years old and I'll never part with it! The problem is that when you've loaded the film into the unit and then rolled it out into the tank, the internal blade won't cut the film as, although the film is 'finer' than celluloid, it's millions of times tougher! There are two solutions to this (if you're interested!?). [1] when you attach your film to the film canister spindle to begin with, use only a little Sellotape on one side of the film, just enough to allow you to load the film into the canister/cartridge. If you're rolling 24 exposures - then aim to load enough for 27. for a 36 loaded film then maybe enough for 39 - then ensure you shoot 24 or 36 respectively. When you come to use your Rondinax, just roll out the whole film and the small amount of Sellotape will simply come off the spindle in the canister and there's no need to cut it in the tank. [2] the 2nd solution is even more convoluted and I'll be happy to respond to anyone interested.

    Anyway, I'm always happy to give and receive any advice, pointers suggestions with other fellow amateurs - of which I'm very much at a humble level!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails E Campbell 1.jpg   E Campbell 2.jpg   E Campbell 3.jpg   E Campbell 4.jpg   E Campbell 5.jpg  

    E Campbell 6.jpg  

  6. #46
    AgX
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    Rondinax 35

    You might have a look at the knive. If it it does not look sharp, might take it out and try to resharpen it. But due to its serrated form you need special tools. Do not attempt it unless you successfully did similar work before.

    Alternatively you might try the Agfa Rondix 35. It is a daylight-loading tank of more simple design and without reel. The film is not cut off.

    The most recent model of a daylight-loading tank comes from Jobo and was marketed until few years ago. It is based on the 1500 tank system.

  7. #47

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    Hi, and thanks for the response!
    (sorry, I don't know your name - I'm Eoin!)

    The blade's fine it's simply that the synthetic Polypan film is too tough to cut. The blade on the Rondinax cuts upward into a thin plastic slot on the inside of the lid. The gap between the two sides of this lid is just a little too wide and the Polypan film, rather than being cut, is pushed upward and into this gap. This can compress the film on the film spool. The alternative to my fist suggestion was to narrow the gap in this slot is to put a few strips of insulating tape over it. I used about three layers. Then with a razor-sharp blade, recut the slit for the Rondinax blade to go through. This works for me. But the earlier suggestion is the best, less fuss and you never need to worry about wasting your precious shots and film if it won't cut!

    Now, I heard about the Rondinax 35. Is that the one that develops the film within its cartridge? If so, I understand the results are variable at best. But I will look out for the Jobo - that sounds interesting!

    Thanks again for your response! I'll battle on with this film, I really do like it and it's such good value!

  8. #48

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    With the daylight tanks, usually they need more chemicals than a Jobo 1500 or a Paterson. A changing-bag can do far more than just loading spirals and doesn't cost any more than a third-hand daylight-loading tank. . .

  9. #49

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    Hi, Martin!
    The Rondinax is just superb, I use it for Colour C41 now too! It uses only 200ml of each chemical solution and I'll get 5 or 6 rolls easily. The only chemical that 'gets tired' is the Fixer. So in truth, this is replaced after about 4 films. I've used Tetenal for the colour negatives and I've achieved 8 rolls out of a 200ml solution (mixed!) with no visible deterioration in the quality of the negatives or scans.
    If I'm correct, the Jobos and Pattersons use much more solution even for only one spiral. The only downside to the Rondinax is that you can only do one roll of negative at a time. Other than that, I swear by it! Top results every time!
    I have a mini 'tent' as opposed to the bag and I only need that for loading up the bulk loader. This was a downside to the Polypan - the 90m spool is too large to fit in the loader so I managed to get about 40+ metres in.
    What do you use? What's your setup?
    Regards
    Eoin

  10. #50

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    Sorry, meant to add...
    Further advantage of the Rondinax is that you load the film straight in... no need for a dark bag. For me, this is one of the main selling points.

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