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  1. #21
    Mainecoonmaniac's Avatar
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    That's why the description is so scant

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken Nadvornick View Post
    That guy is missing the entire top cover piece on the cage. That's why it's so inexpensive. And why no one will bite.
    Caveat Emptor

    Sorry for the bum recommendation

  2. #22
    Tony-S's Avatar
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    Taco method works great for me.

  3. #23

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    I just use a daylight tank for 4x5. I do try and save and replenish the developer from it, as it is kinda pricey to dump the tank down the drain.
    We had stainless tanks at my school, but each tank had the fun part where only one lid would fit each of the seemingly identical tanks correctly. And then each lid had only one smaller cover (for pouring in the chemicals, I don't know the technical name) that fit properly. Yeah, that wasn't very fun.
    I would suggest a drum for processing, actually. Some hold the film on the side of the drum, so you don't need as much chemicals to process a batch as a daylight tank does, as daylight tanks hold film vertically, and if you have one sheet or twelve, you need a full tank.
    Now, if you wanted to do something a bit more advanced, I would suggest getting one of those little tabletop drum processors, as you could probably get some color work done with them.

  4. #24
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    I very much prefer Diafine developer for tray processing due to its insensitivity to variation in time and/or temperature.
    It gives great results with all b&w films.

    All of my 8x10 and some 4x5 is done in trays using Diafine. Works great, emulsion DOWN as AA and others have suggested.
    I use the dimple-bottom Cescolite trays, which are no longer in production but can be found used.

    HTH

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  5. #25

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    I started using the taco method for multiple 4x5 and 9x12cm sheets, or if I did one sheet, I'd just slide it into the tank emulsion side in and roll the tank. Worked well enough.

    Then I went in search of a Paterson Orbital (it's a bit like a daylight tray), which I really like. Very economical with chemicals, and I get nice even results every time. It does four 4x5/9x12, two 5x7 or one 8x10 at a time.

  6. #26

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    Leigh: a very good idea. I hadn't even considered Diafine!

    I usually run D-76 or Rodinal, but Diafine is an excellent choice for tray processing. How difficult is it to maintain a temperature in practice? I normally process my roll film in stainless tanks at 75F in the summer because it's impossible to get water down to 68F, and even if it were possible, the ambient temperature in the room would raise it back up to 75F anyway. Winter is a different matter.

    I guess the main difference between tray and tank processing is with a tray your fingers touch the chemistry and will eventually warm it up. How much of a problem is that?

  7. #27
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    In my experience:

    Trays--everyone has them, and if you learn the technique, you can process any format with any developer and as many sheets as you can handle or as few as you need to, but you've got to learn the technique, or you'll have scratched negatives.

    Deep tanks--Probably the easiest particularly for high-volume processing, but they use a lot of chemistry, so you're mainly limited to long lasting or replenishable developers (or mixing up a lot of your favorite one-shot developer for each batch). That way, they're always ready to go, whenever you want to process, and you can use them for rollfilm on reels as well as sheets up to the maximum size of the tank.

    Daylight tanks--The Nikor tank is expensive, but it's a great solution, if you like to process sheet film the same way you process rollfilm. Maximum size, though, is 4x5", and you can do 12 sheets per batch. 6 per batch in Jobo's plastic version of the film cage. I've never used the HP Combiplan, but some people like that. I wouldn't recommend the Yankee daylight tanks.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
    Photography (not as up to date as the flickr site)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com/photo
    Academic (Slavic and Comparative Literature)--http://www.davidagoldfarb.com

  8. #28
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brofkand View Post
    Diafine is an excellent choice for tray processing. How difficult is it to maintain a temperature in practice?
    Diafine does not care about temperature. It can be anywhere from 70F to 85F, and can vary over that range during use, with
    absolutely no change in results.

    It also doesn't care about time. You're supposed to do at least 3 minutes in each solution, and no more than 5 minutes.
    I use 5 minutes because it gives me a bit of time to do other things.

    Agitation should be minimal. This may be the most important aspect of tray development with Diafine.
    It's a compensating developer, and excessive agitation will reduce that compensating effect.

    The neat thing about Diafine is that it lasts forever at working strength (it's never diluted for use). Just replenish
    per the instructions and it will last for decades. I've personally used it for over 50 years.

    Replenishment is done simply by replacing the volume of Solution A that's lost during processing, then adding the
    same amount of Solution B to its working bottle, discarding excess used solution.

    I just wrote a rather lengthy description of Diafine in another current thread here about "How many rolls...?".

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  9. #29
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Diafine needs to be warm

    I will probably/should post this in the other Diafine thread as well...

    Leigh is correct in saying that Diafine doesn't require temperature precision, but it does require a bit of warmth.

    The recommendation of 70F to 85F is fine, but it is important to have it at a temperature of at least 70F.

    Diafine doesn't perform well in cooler circumstances.
    Last edited by MattKing; 07-21-2012 at 02:50 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  10. #30
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    I tried trays with D-76 at the Glen Echo darkroom. The trays worked ok.
    I bought hangers and big deep tanks, but I had no where to store them with the large chemistry volumes. I sold them.
    I bought a Yankee Daylight tank mail order. I did not like it. I was told by many people about the uneven development. I returned it unused.
    I used the credit to buy a NOS Jobo 3010 Expert Tank at Per Volquartz's recommendation. [~$310US]
    I found a Jobo CPE 2+ through APUG Classified for ~$100US plus $40US for shipping, no lift, no bottles, no tanks.
    Two days after the Jobo CPE 2+ arrived, I saw a Jobo CPP 2 through APUG Classified for ~$150US plus $30US for shipping, a lift, bottles, two tanks.
    I bought the CPP2.
    I sold the CPE 2+ on APUG for about what I paid for it.

    Bought the book The Rotary Processor Manual by John Tinsley. Read the book. Developed several rolls of film and 4"x5" sheets with replenished XTOL. Then I moved on to C41 film processing.

    I am one very happy camper. The costs of the Expert Tank and the CPP 2 processor will be amortized for years while I develop spotless and streak free film for years. Priceless!
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

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