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  1. #1

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    First Roll from New Mamiya 7

    Developed the first roll of Tri-X in Arista Premium Film Developer in 1:9 dilution. Mamiya 7 and 80mm lens. This image was made of my 15 year old son on the driving range. If I remember correctly, the Shutter speed was 1/125. It captures the moment just after the club has made contact, launching the golf ball:

    [IMG] 00140006 by KentWebb, on Flickr[/IMG]

    I am new to developing film, and I had reused the developer 3-4 times after about 2 weeks, but I think the negative is acceptable. I will subsequently be using this developer as a one shot developer. I'm open to suggestions. Thanks,

    Kent

  2. #2

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    looks good. Any time I use a dilute developer -- i mostly use d76 1:1, it is a one-shot and toss it, you lose concentration otherwise and have to add developing time by some complicated formula I've nevver had time for.

  3. #3
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I would like to suggest to be more careful with your final rinse and wetting agent. The top right corner has some residue in it that should not be there. It is very difficult to judge the quality of a negative based on a scan, but it looks as though you have decent shadow detail, but a few blocked up highlights suggesting you may have developed a little bit too long.

    Have fun with your camera! The M7 is a really great camera system.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  4. #4

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    I see what you mean. At first, I thought it was the edge of a backlit cloud, but I looked at the negative with an 8x Loupe and it appears to be photo flo residue. Any tips for preventing this in the future? I think I wiped negatives with my index and long fingers as I was removing the negative from the tank with wetting agent. I've seen pros and cons regarding using a squeegee on the negatives. Thanks, and BTW, your recent Sturgeon Bay gallery photograph is fantastic!

    Kent


    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    I would like to suggest to be more careful with your final rinse and wetting agent. The top right corner has some residue in it that should not be there. It is very difficult to judge the quality of a negative based on a scan, but it looks as though you have decent shadow detail, but a few blocked up highlights suggesting you may have developed a little bit too long.

    Have fun with your camera! The M7 is a really great camera system.

  5. #5
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BardParker View Post
    I see what you mean. At first, I thought it was the edge of a backlit cloud, but I looked at the negative with an 8x Loupe and it appears to be photo flo residue. Any tips for preventing this in the future? I think I wiped negatives with my index and long fingers as I was removing the negative from the tank with wetting agent. I've seen pros and cons regarding using a squeegee on the negatives. Thanks, and BTW, your recent Sturgeon Bay gallery photograph is fantastic!

    Kent
    Hi Kent,

    There are lots of ways to do this. Kodak makes some really first class films and emulsions, as do Ilford and Fuji. They are treated to be highly resistant to damage during processing. The way I do it is that I take the edge of a rubber windshield wiper, make sure there is absolutely nothing harmful trapped on the blade edge, dip it in wetting agent (PhotoFlo), and gently run it along the entire length of the film. Both sides. Even the emulsion side. I have never had a scratch using this technique, and have used the same wiper blade edge for roughly 1,000 rolls of film. Not a spot on the negs either. I use Sprint 'End of Run' wetting agent, by the way, but I'm sure PhotoFlo works just as well or better.

    Thanks for the kind words!

    - Thomas
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6

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    Keep your fingers off the negs. They are never ever clean enough even if you just washed them.

    Follow directions with Photoflow. Thin it too much and it does not flow and you get drying drops. The harder the water,the more flow you need. If you have really hard water, then finial two rinses should be distilled water+flow at 1:500.

    Naturally you want to keep the crud off the negs in the first place. Water and air filters and clean glass bottles are your friend.



 

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