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  1. #11
    dwross's Avatar
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    Thanks! Keeping TLF up-to-date would almost be a fulltime job in itself -- products come and go (mostly go) so fast. The site was originally intended to be a work-in-progress communal effort, but the communal part isn't so much right now. Not really surprising, I suppose. Photography has always had a big component of secret-keeping mentality. Anyway, I'm plugging away at keeping the "old" updated at the same time as generating new research and recipes. I'm aiming at keeping all ingredients compatible with what Photographers' Formulary has in their catalog. Ian Grant is keeping one eye on European local options. Photoflo 200 is a good surfactant to try.

    Vodka is essentially half Everclear (i.e. ethanol) and half water. Set aside some to drink (I do!) but keep some for the darkroom. Great stuff, inside and out!

    Hardeners are added one or two of two different ways -- in the emulsion right before coating (the term is a "final") and/or during processing -- before the developer, and/or in the stop bath, and/or with the fix. Steve Anchell's "The Darkroom Cookbook" is an invaluable reference.

    Extra heat before the emulsion is exposed, processed, and dry is mostly fatal. Don't. And, I don't think heat after processing will crackle things. Note also, that too much hardener in the finals can make the emulsion very resistant to processing chemistry. The classic hardeners are chrome alum and glyoxal.

    Any simple emulsion recipe is as good as any other to try first. You're really going to just have to dig in and play.
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

  2. #12

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    Thank you very much. I have another question. Since the emulsion is not variable contrast, how can I control the contrast? What kind of developer should I use?

  3. #13
    dwross's Avatar
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    "The Darkroom Cookbook" is really where you want to start. It's very good at separating categories of developers and explaining fine-tuning characteristics. And/or, you could start a thread here asking something like "How do I Control Contrast with Development?" The old emulsions are beautifully responsive to tweaking.

    Taste in developers is very personal and specific. I highly recommend you play with several before you settle in. As you read the Cookbook, you'll notice that most developers have the same set of ingredients in common. It's mostly a matter of proportions. Avoid the recipes with oddball ingredients (at least in the beginning) and you'll be just fine. One of my favorite recipes, D23, has just two cheap chemicals.

    d
    www.thelightfarm.com
    Dedicated to Handmade Silver Gelatin Paper, Film, and Dry Plates.

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