Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,693   Posts: 1,482,431   Online: 849
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    darkosaric's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Hamburg, Germany
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,148
    I was thinking how much influence for getting "vintage look" has subject itself?
    For sure you will get more vintage look taking photos in some old village then from Tokyo car show .

  2. #12
    Rolleijoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    I live at home.
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    510
    Images
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Two23 View Post
    I haven't owned a 35mm camera since 2005, but last week I lost my mind and bought a Leica IIIc made in 1942, with Elmar 5cm f3.5 and Jupiter 35mm f2.8. Will likely get an Elmar 90mm f4 as well. The 5cm f3.5 is uncoated, and the 90mm probably will be too. I like the look. SO, I'm looking for some film that will give me a classic 1940s look. I already use HP5 in my Rolleiflex and Chamonix 045n and really like its smoothness. I shoot Efke 25 in my Chamonix when using pre-Civil War lenses, but I think this is too slow for the Leica. What's out there in the ISO 100 range that would be a nice complement for a 1940s Leica? I'm after "vintage" more than TMax/Delta sharpness.


    Kent in SD
    The film speeds at that time were very slow by today's standards, and partly what contributes to what we refer to as "vintage" look. Fortunately one film/developer combination is still around from that time, and it's Efke 25 & Rodinal. I shoot Rollei Ortho 25 regularly, as well as the Efke. Both are excellent films.

    The Rolleipan 200 is very similar to Agfapan, which I always used to photograph WW2 battleships & submarines, because of delivering that same tonality. If that's the look you're going for, Rolleipan 200 would be the way to go. If you're searching for an earlier look, the Efke 25 & Efke 100 would be the way to go, processed in Rodinal.

    Good luck, and congratulations on a fine camera.
    If the lens doesn't read "ZEISS", then it just isn't.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    15,260
    Blog Entries
    2
    Images
    2
    hi kent

    its about the developer as much as it is the film --
    why not process the film in something they would have used
    in the 40s, like dilute dektol or a print plate/film / "universal" developer.
    new developers are great, but old - school really brings out the look that they had back in the day...

    have fun !
    john

  4. #14
    mhcfires's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    El Cajon, CA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    540
    Quote Originally Posted by Rolleijoe View Post
    The film speeds at that time were very slow by today's standards, and partly what contributes to what we refer to as "vintage" look. Fortunately one film/developer combination is still around from that time, and it's Efke 25 & Rodinal. I shoot Rollei Ortho 25 regularly, as well as the Efke. Both are excellent films.

    The Rolleipan 200 is very similar to Agfapan, which I always used to photograph WW2 battleships & submarines, because of delivering that same tonality. If that's the look you're going for, Rolleipan 200 would be the way to go. If you're searching for an earlier look, the Efke 25 & Efke 100 would be the way to go, processed in Rodinal.

    Good luck, and congratulations on a fine camera.
    +1

    I have a Leica IIIa, manufactured date 1935, coupled with the Summar 50/2 I regularly use Efke 25 with much success. It is a fun camera to use, I use it as much as my M2. Slow film is no problem for these old cameras, use it and enjoy it. Rolleijoe has the right idea, I also use Rodinal for development.
    Michael Cienfuegos


    If you don't want to stand behind our troops, please feel free to stand in front of them.

  5. #15
    bsdunek's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,058
    Images
    180
    How about Adox CHS 25 Art? Adox says these are the old emulsions. As said above, using the right developer contributes to the 'look'. D-76 has been around about as long as anything.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Southern USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    3,522
    The classic look that the OP wishes to emulate was determined by the following factors.

    1. The films of the time were orthochromatic. This altered the tones of the subject. Foliage was lighter and shadows were more open. The sky was usually featureless with no clouds. Reds were darker which changed skin tones.
    2. Film emulsions were thicker than modern film and had coarse grain. This caused dispersion and softening of the image.
    3. Films were slow which forced the use of more static subjects.
    4. Lenses made before WWII were uncoated and subject to flare.
    5. Subject determined factors; the models clothes, makeup, hair style, etc. Also older technology -- large radios in the home and no TV, older style cars, etc.
    6. In an age without the strobe light more attention was made to natural lighting assisted by flash bulbs or flash powder.

    As can be seen from the incomplete list above, film was only part of the look of old photos.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  7. #17
    Jim Noel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Shooter
    Large Format
    Posts
    1,762
    Blog Entries
    1
    If you want a vintage look you need more than vintage lenses. Start with a film closer to what was available. Until about 1950 the fastest film generally available was Super XX with a Weston rating of 100. The most commonly available 35mm film during WWII was DuPont Superior #2 with a Weston Speed of 50. Efke 25 comes close to these in structure and speed. The curve will be more like DuPont because Super XX had a straight line curve which is not really approached today.
    Vintage developers are another necessity - D-23,D-76, etc.
    Papers are another story since cadmium and other chemicals common in the old papers are not allowed today. Best alternative would be hand coated POP.
    [FONT=Comic Sans MS]Films NOT Dead - Just getting fixed![/FONT]

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin