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  1. #11
    Rolfe Tessem's Avatar
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    Jobo's recommendation (back when they were an analog company) was that a five minute pre-wet compensated almost exactly for the continuous agitation. Or, to put it another way, if you use a five minute pre-wet you can use the exact times published for inversion processing with intermittent agitation. In fact, the automatic Jobo processors all build in a five minute pre-wet.

    Over hundreds (possibly a thousand) rolls, this has proven true in my experience.

    The confusion results from the fact that when Kodak came out with Xtol, which was after rotary processing became established practice, the company went to the trouble of testing. It then published times for rotary processing WITHOUT the pre-wet. This is why those times are 15% shorter, but I see no good reason not to do the pre-wet. It slows down the times to become more manageable in some circumstance and also allows you to use all the published times for virtually any film/developer combination with confidence.

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  3. #13
    Roger Cole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rolfe Tessem View Post
    Jobo's recommendation (back when they were an analog company) was that a five minute pre-wet compensated almost exactly for the continuous agitation. Or, to put it another way, if you use a five minute pre-wet you can use the exact times published for inversion processing with intermittent agitation. In fact, the automatic Jobo processors all build in a five minute pre-wet.

    Over hundreds (possibly a thousand) rolls, this has proven true in my experience.

    The confusion results from the fact that when Kodak came out with Xtol, which was after rotary processing became established practice, the company went to the trouble of testing. It then published times for rotary processing WITHOUT the pre-wet. This is why those times are 15% shorter, but I see no good reason not to do the pre-wet. It slows down the times to become more manageable in some circumstance and also allows you to use all the published times for virtually any film/developer combination with confidence.
    Exactly what I do and my experience mirrors yours and Jobo's recommendation - five minute pre-wet, which also gets the film stabilized to the same temperature the developer will be, and use the regular times for small tanks as starting points. Across multiple films from multiple brands and with multiple developers from different companies they are consistently very similar to results with small tank inversion processing. Of course you need to work out your own times anyway, but that's the place to start.

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