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  1. #31
    Photo Engineer's Avatar
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    Both methods require energy!

    Ionc exchange works by making either R+ or R- resins. A mixed bed has both. R is a huge polymer with lots of + or - things attached. So, run in Calcium loaded water and you get Ca++ and (R-)2 and the Calcium is stuck on the resin. You could then end up with either Sulfuric Acid or Sodium Sulfate if the counter ion is Sulfate. So, you have R_ present and SO4--. This makes (R+)2 and SO4-- and so no ion gets through. But, organics go through unchanged.

    So, they add a gel like nonionic resin that absorbs organics. Sometimes they use Carbon black. Either works.

    Making and disposing of these resins after use is energy expensive.

    Distillation boils water which then goes through a condenser where it turns from steam back to water. The Calcium Sulfate stays behind, and the organics are destroyed by the heat for the most part. After use, scale is found in the pot and this is cleaned out by treatment with hot water or a special cleaning solution that dissolves the scale. It puts back everything into the environment that was taken out. It is more friendly and less energy intensive in the long run because there is no wast to contend with except what you started with. The starting materials (Calcium Sulfate and water) are now in separate containers.

    You may have government regulations and other problems to contend with, but distillation is far simpler.

    PE

  2. #32
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    IC;

    Such a filter is quite effective. If it works for you, use it.

    If you don't mind throwing away a cartridge every few weeks, then this is just fine too.

    PE

  3. #33
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    Yep thats what i will try.
    Some one locally has reccomended a di filter used for marine fish. They run at around £20 and last for a lot of water, so a trip to the fish shop might be worthwhile.
    PE yes the laws in the UK are often insane!!
    Alan

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  4. #34
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    John Voss

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  5. #35
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    Interesting point, and probably valid. Not something that I had considered.

    - Leigh
    Actually it's a no brainer here in Europe, most so called Distilled water sold in shops and garages is often de-ionised anyway. Ion exchange columns are quite cheap and there's no disposal costs (they go back for recycling/regeneration) so the cost per litre is next to nothing, distilled water in comparison is rathe expensive these days.

    In the UK my water comes from two sources, local boreholes and it's very hard, or from Nth Wales very soft, we are ona boundaty so can be given either or a mixture. The local borehole watre will begin to fur up a kettle instantly, a hot bath will have scum but even a deionising filre jug is enough to give us good water.

    In Turkey the local water whether from our borehole or tanker (from nearby lake) is way too hard and has a very high salt content, we live by the sea, the lak/resovoir is a silted up estuary.

    Ian

  6. #36
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    The reaction "good resin" + "bad water" -> "bad resin" + "good water" is driven by a rapid forward chemical reaction that precipitates the impurities and allows water free of impurities to pass through. The reaction is heavily balanced to the right, and takes little or no energy to accomplish.

    To reverse the reaction and regenerate the free good resin takes a great deal of energy compared to the other direction, and a lot of water and acid. This energy must come from somewhere.

    At EK, we developed a wet process that produced potable water as its output. It was totally self contained with only resins as the waste product. It was a closed system once charged with the chemicals and wash water, and the only loss was through evaporation of the solutions.

    It was deemed impractical and the project was left unfinished.

    I have seen commercial stills here in the US. They are about the size of a digital printer. And, they can produce many gallons per day.

    Your selection must be considered on long term costs, daily operation and local laws for use of stills and for the disposal of these cartridges. Don't take the advice of any one person here. Your solution should be based on what you can afford and what is legally applicable.

    PE

  7. #37
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    Scrape out your freezer with A plastic scraper. The ice is De ionised. Let it melt and voila

  8. #38
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    Not good in some cases.

    Mold and mildew grow in dehumidifiers and freezers. You can see it in the black spots on the gasket on many freezers.

    PE

  9. #39
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    Some people get the condensation water of the air conditioner and filters it with aquarium filters. Considering the small quantities involved if it is used only for the final rinse, the industrial produce is probably a safer choice.

    If one's tap water is so bad that one must use alternative water for all baths, I wouldn't rule out cheap bottled water which can be very, very cheap, for the six baths and then deionised water for the final rinse.
    Fabrizio Ruggeri fine art photography site: http://fabrizio-ruggeri.artistwebsites.com
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  10. #40
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    At one time manufacturers recommended boiling water and letting it cool and settle, fitering if needed, this would remove the worst of the hardness from the water and make a significant differance.

    Sometimes wetting agent alone isn't sufficient and boiled water would be better when no deionised water is available.

    Ian

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