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  1. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Photo Engineer View Post
    As I said, use distilled!!!!! It is less expensive and is perfectly fine.

    Using DI water instead of DW is like using a cannon to shoot gnats.

    The only thing worse (more expensive and uselessly so) would be to use DI DW. That is way overkill.

    Use Distilled Water. Here it is less than $1 / gallon. You can even buy small stills to make it yourself.

    PE
    There are various grades of both distilled and deionized water. Simple, single distilled water is made in large quantities in many urban areas and is, indeed, cheap. Triple distilled water using tin condensers is used in some chemical and electronic processes and is very expensive. An elaborate deionization and filtration setup can produce water of about the same quality as triple distilled at a somewhat lower cost. A simple deionizing scheme can produce decently pure water at a cost only slightly higher than distillation and at a significantly lower hardware and setup cost. For very small scale water purification, deionization is usually the way to go.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by nworth View Post
    There are various grades of both distilled and deionized water. Simple, single distilled water is made in large quantities in many urban areas and is, indeed, cheap. Triple distilled water using tin condensers is used in some chemical and electronic processes and is very expensive. An elaborate deionization and filtration setup can produce water of about the same quality as triple distilled at a somewhat lower cost. A simple deionizing scheme can produce decently pure water at a cost only slightly higher than distillation and at a significantly lower hardware and setup cost. For very small scale water purification, deionization is usually the way to go.
    Home stills are quite common, http://homedistiller.org/equip/photos-sold

    Although the above are reflux stills in most cases, intended for alcohol, there are many others for water: http://www.jenconsusa.com/10-Water-S...ill-4000X.html and if you look at the dimensions you will see how small these are.

    I am not advocating any method, just stating the fact that you can use either, and that there are advantages and disadvantages to both methods (distillation or deionization).

    The bottom line is that all commercial developers and fixers are designed to work with tap water. They contain ingredients that prevent particulate matter from forming from hard water. And so, a true test is to mix some developer with tap water and look for the formation of sediment. I know that that is a harsh way to test due to expense if the test fails, but then it does work.

    I don't use DW myself for mixing anything but materials for emulsion making. At EK, I did the same. We had tap water to use to test formulas with. And, what I have said goes for both color and B&W.

    PE

  3. #43
    salan's Avatar
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    I thank everyone for their input, but I think I have my answers and this thread has run it's course.
    Alan

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    At one time manufacturers recommended boiling water and letting it cool and settle, fitering if needed, this would remove the worst of the hardness from the water and make a significant differance.
    Yes, the are two types of hardness; temporary hardness and permanent hardness. The temporary hardness is from calcium bicarbonate formed from water containing dissolved carbon dioxide flowing over limestone.

    H2O + CO2 + CaCO3 ---> Ca(HCO3)2

    Boiling the water reverses the above reaction and the resultant calcium carbonate which is insoluble will settle out. The permanent hardness is from various magnesium salts such as magnesium chloride in the water and they are unaffected by boiling. However, the permanent hardness is usually not a problem for photographers.

    Bring the water to a full rolling boil for 5 to 10 minutes in an uncovered container of glass, stainless steel, or agate ware. Cover and allow it to cool overnight. Decant or filter off the softened water.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  5. #45
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    i'd use britta-filtered water to eliminate calciumdeposits and 0.5g/l of edta(photo calgon)if that is not good enough.works wonders to make good tea too. the latter being an opportunity to share the expense.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

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