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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by wburgess View Post
    ......Having looked at the same FP4 Plus rolls, the 120 backing is clear whilst the 35 is slightly purple/blue. Why would this be different, surely it's the same formulation?

    Would over/under exposing cause much difference in contrast and tone range?
    The film bases are different. 35mm film base in most cases has density built into the base itself. In the case of 120 film, antihalation is dealt with by with a back coating which washes off during processing. This is not a problem.

    Underexposing will result in conspicuous clear shadows (in the neg) and general lower density. In prints it will result in somewhat dark featureless shadows.

  2. #12
    jimrohrer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mcgrattan View Post
    If it was me I'd look again at exposure. A hood will make a difference, though. The front element of a Rollei lens is quite exposed.
    I second that...

  3. #13

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    I would try the same film in both cameras for a while, after checking the lens on the Rollei. Exposure can affect contrast if it's off far enough, but the real control for it is development.
    At some point with a roll in each camera, shoot a simple composition with large areas of various tonal values with both cameras, ensuring no change in light between shots. Develop both together if you can. It may tell you something.
    In any case, many folks will advise one film and developer until things are predictable.

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by George Collier View Post
    In any case, many folks will advise one film and developer until things are predictable.
    This is sound advice. I've got heavily carried away moving back to film, I had forgotten how superb it really is.

    Interestingly, the C-41 films I've developed at home demonstrate good contrast (from what I can tell atm without printing).

    I'll have a go with shooting the same subject with both cameras, I might even bracket exposures on the rolleiflex to rule this out too.

    Checking readings between my OM-2 and iPhone, a setting was recorded at 1/13th on the om and 1/60th on the iPhone... this could definitely be my problem.

    Will also fetch a hood for the rollei soon. Many photos have suffered from flare on backlit situations.

  5. #15
    JPD
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPC View Post
    Do you know what coatings, single or multi, the lenses have? That can affect flare/contrast. Also, you mentioned cleaning marks. If an improper cleaner was used on the lens in the past, some of the coatings could have been damaged or removed, affecting flare/contrast. If you are sure the lenses are fine then I would say it is an exposure problem.
    The Tessar has only six glass/air surfaces and multicoating doesn't improve contrast that much on this type of lens. Damaged coating on the front element isn't a big deal. Uncoated pre-war Tessars perform very well.

    Quote Originally Posted by wburgess View Post
    Checking readings between my OM-2 and iPhone, a setting was recorded at 1/13th on the om and 1/60th on the iPhone... this could definitely be my problem.
    That's very likely. With a fine camera like a Rolleiflex you should invest in a real light meter. Take another test roll with the Rollei and use the OM-2 to meter the light. Don't forget to set it to the correct ISO!
    J. Patric Dahlén

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