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  1. #1

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    A few words on the B & W films still available

    Hi Folks....after over a decade away from film, I am back shooting medium format film. I am waaay out of practice with film and was wondering if folks who have the time, and inclination, help me out with some guidance on the black and white films that are still available for 120. Due to the cost, I would rather start out experimenting with some initial ideas from friendly folks here rather than all on my own. Soooooo, if you could write your impressions of the following films, just a sentence or two (nothing large), that would be MOST helpful! Things like when not to use such a film would also help a lot.

    Kodak

    Tmax 100
    Tmax 400
    Tri-X 400

    Ilford

    Delta 100
    Delta 400
    Delta 3200
    HP5 400
    FP4 125

    Fujifilm

    Neopan 100


    THANK YOU VERY MUCH!!

  2. #2
    hsandler's Avatar
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    I am in a similar position. I have been shooting Delta 100 and 400 at rated speed and developing in Kdak Tmax developer using times and temperatures from The Massive Developing Chart with good results. Recently I tried pushing Delta 400 to ISO 1600 in Tmax and it worked well, although obviously more grainy. I should mention I scan my negatives and dont print in a darkroom.

  3. #3

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    tmx ( 100 ) tends to get really blocked-up if you use a flash.
    i have used pretty much all the films mentioned,
    and they all can yield great negatives.
    i tend to over expose and over develop my film and process everything
    in coffee with a shot of print developer for good measure.
    except for delta3200 ( i have never used 120 version of this film )
    i have never had trouble with any of the films mentioned.

    have fun !
    john
    Last edited by jnanian; 08-05-2012 at 11:01 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4
    markbarendt's Avatar
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    All of them are very nice films. They all work very well. All can provide museum quality results.

    We really have no clue what will suit your preferences best, neither do you probably, I know I didn't when I came back to film. Mostly we just have opinions about what suits us best. To really understand what suits you, you need to shoot and print and even then your preferences will change over time as your experience grows.

    There are lots of threads addressing this already, I'd suggest a few searches, like "FP4 vs" or "Acros vs" or whatever.

    The best advice is just get out and shoot and have fun.

    If you want reliable exposures right off the bat, use an incident meter, shoot at box speed, develop your film per the directions with something normal like D76 or XTol.

    If you are using a lab you might een start with Ilford XP2 instead.
    Mark Barendt, Ignacio, CO

    "We do not see things the way they are. We see things the way we are." Anaïs Nin

  5. #5

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    I mainly use Kodak products for film. Tmax400 and Tri-X are so flexible and capable, I don't know when NOT to use them...

    These days most film are so much alike other than obvious things like ISO speed. Sure, you can make them act differently but that's true to a lot of extent with any film.

    When-ever I don't know what exactly to expect, my standard film is Tmax400. Processed normally with D-76, I have never been disappointing.
    Last edited by tkamiya; 08-05-2012 at 11:06 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #6

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    Ok...I think I asked too much. How about something simple like, TMax 400 vs Delta 400. What would be best for street photography? Delta 100 vs Tmax 100 vs Neopan 100? Same thing, for street use.

    Thank you everyone!

  7. #7

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    I see variations of this question from time to time. Which film is best? Which film should I use? My thoughts: It doesn't matter. Just pick one and start using it. For me I started using T-Max 400 as my standard 400 speed film. I am trying to select different papers to get different looks in the print. You will see more differences in papers and printing techniques that you will by changing films. Once you settle on a couple of different papers, you can start to tweek your film processing to get desired results from the paper.
    Dave

    "She's always out making pictures, She's always out making scenes.
    She's always out the window, When it comes to making Dreams.

    It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up, It's all mixed up."

    From It's All Mixed Up by The Cars

  8. #8

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    Thanks Mopar guy...That helps a lot....I'll focus mainly on price at first, so I can shoot more film and experiment. Neopan is the cheapest if I remember right.

  9. #9

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    Virtually any film and developer combination will deliver good results - you just need to pick one and learn how it works.

    As a guide, for my photography I have been standardised for over 10 years on Delta 400 (with an EI of 200 following testing) developed in Barry Thornton's two bath for 5.5 minutes in each bath.

    It works well for me, I know exactly what I will get and my results are always consistent. I have also been standardised on Adox Fine Print Vario Classic glossy developed in Dokumol for 3.5 minutes.

    People choose all different combinations of film, developer, paper, technique to suit their tastes.

    For me, my choice has been for totally repeatable and predictable results, fine grain, sharp negatives with good micro-contrast and a full tonal range in my prints. Working in this way, I can concentrate on finding new images without any other concerns because all variables have been pinned down.

    Hope this helps,

    David
    www.dsallen.de
    D.S. Allen, fotograf.

    Neue 3D Ausstellung/New 3D exhibition: www.german-fine-arts.com/berlin.html
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by David Allen View Post
    Virtually any film and developer combination will deliver good results - you just need to pick one and learn how it works.

    As a guide, for my photography I have been standardised for over 10 years on Delta 400 (with an EI of 200 following testing) developed in Barry Thornton's two bath for 5.5 minutes in each bath.

    It works well for me, I know exactly what I will get and my results are always consistent. I have also been standardised on Adox Fine Print Vario Classic glossy developed in Dokumol for 3.5 minutes.

    People choose all different combinations of film, developer, paper, technique to suit their tastes.

    For me, my choice has been for totally repeatable and predictable results, fine grain, sharp negatives with good micro-contrast and a full tonal range in my prints. Working in this way, I can concentrate on finding new images without any other concerns because all variables have been pinned down.

    Hope this helps,

    David
    www.dsallen.de
    Thanks David. I understand what you are saying here. When you say Delta 400 with an EI of 200, that means over exposing 1 stop, right? You are setting the iso at 200 correct? Thanks again.

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