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Thread: ACROS Name?

  1. #11

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    I read that George Eastman used Kodak because it sounded like the click of the shutter. Sometimes things that appear to have links are just random!

  2. #12

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    Here is a George Eastman quote on the work Kodak. "Philologically, the word Kodak is as meaningless as a child’s first ’goo’—terse, abrupt to the point of rudeness, literally bitten off by firm and unyielding consonants at both ends, it snaps like a camera shutter in your face. What more would one ask!"

    As a plus it is easily pronounced in most languages increasing the company's visibility. As a child Eastman was said to play a game looking for palindromes, Kodak is close but not perfect.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  3. #13

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    To Mustafa and all others who are interested in languages may I suggest the following very informative book, "The Loom of Language An Approach to the Mastery of Many Languages", Frederick Bodmer, W W Norton & Company, ISBN 0-393-30034-X (available in paperback). I found it very interesting and it explained to me the similarities in such geographically isolated languages as Latin, Irish, and Russian. These branches of the Indo-European family tree of languages all split off at the same time. For example the word for land is terra in Latin and tir in Irish. The word for mother is mater, maither, and materu in Latin, Irish, and Russian (genitive singular transliterated to the roman alphabet). Having studied all three languages this book confirmed my early suspicians.

    The book would be very useful for English speakers wishing to learn a germanic or romance language. English is a germanic language and the book gives as an example a line from The Lord's Prayer in german, dutch, danish, swedish, and icelandic. The danish is the closest to English, "Giv ons i Dag vort daglige Brod." Saying it out loud makes it easy to understand. Again this book is informative, interesting and a fun read (at least for me).
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-08-2012 at 01:51 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  4. #14
    Trasselblad's Avatar
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    Yeah, and mama and baba is Chinese for...guess? And the same in Korean and Japanese too...hmm. And if one were to actually hear a German, a Dane, a Swede, a Dutch and an Icelandic read that line loud, the perception of what comes closest to English may take some reconsidering (I have an oral understanding of all of those, sort of..)

    My point? I don't have one. Or perhaps, that even if languages have or had common roots, evolution did its job. Someone said that the language is the mirror of the culture of the people who speak it. Let's keep it like that.

  5. #15

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    Trasselblad, I started learning german from my father as a small child. Some years ago I worked on a project for a large US company that had a number of swedish engineers. I found spoken swedish impossible to understand even single words. The written language was easier as the similarities were more apparent. Interestingly one of the engineers was quite shocked when I mentioned that English was a germanic language. He had never looked at things that way before.

    As for linquistic evolution people tend to be very conservative and the most used words in a language tend not to change. Somewhere in Loom there is a paragraph witten in perfectly correct angle-saxon that is word for word the same as one would say today. This conservatism allows English speakers to read Chaucer (died 1400) with only a little help. Icelanders seem to hold the record in this as the language of the Sagas is essentially unchanged from the icelandic of today.

    One has to be somewhat carful with examples like mama and baba. The russian word dada means uncle not father.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-08-2012 at 05:41 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  6. #16
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  7. #17
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    The other big question is what the correct pronunciation of acros is. Ah-cross, ack-Ross, across? Lol

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
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    Outstanding!!

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
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    That's my story, and I'm stickin' to it!


    Done and dusted! Love it. That shall be the meaning of ACROS.
    More importantly, go out and use it. The more we use, maybe the less chance Fuji will put ACROS, and others, on the chopping block.


  10. #20
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    The name suits the film. Great for long exposures. One fault. The 120 base too thin for my Super Ikonta IV. Make the frames overlap. But it's my fault.

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