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  1. #11

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    I understand that. I probably just guessed the components of that fixer wrong. I should probably buy English language chemicals from now on.
    "All I can see is starfish, now. Starfish. Starfish everywhere!" -A RISD professor I overheard on a student's design project

  2. #12
    MattKing's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by technowizard12 View Post
    I should probably buy English language chemicals from now on.
    I know that would be good advice for me.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  3. #13

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    It was just so cheap! And without MSDS warnings, I don't have to feel bad about using my mother's kitchen containers!

    (I made sure they weren't used for food afterwards, but still)
    "All I can see is starfish, now. Starfish. Starfish everywhere!" -A RISD professor I overheard on a student's design project

  4. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by technowizard12 View Post
    The confusing thing is, to try and figure out what the fixing time is, I stuck a strip of paper in there to see how long it takes to clear. It never cleared, but the paper fixed in about two minutes.
    But how do you know the paper actually fixed?

    If you want to test fixing time with paper, one way is to put several marks on a strip of paper. Then, in room light, immerse it in fixer up to the first mark for some time (say 5 seconds). Then immerse to the second mark for another time interval, and so on. Finally, immerse the entire strip into DEVELOPER (not your good tray of developer, pour a bit out for this test).

    Since the fixer would ideally remove all of the developable silver halide, fully fixed paper will stay white in developer. The parts that get darker were obviously not fully fixed. So you find the first part which stayed white, and figure how long it was immersed in fixer (you'll probably find this to be about 10 seconds in a commercial rapid fix).

    In the case of FILM, it will actually get clear, so is not necessary to use developer to test film fixing times.

    I don't like to think I'm as incompetent as this post made me sound.
    Well, of course you're incompetent, everybody is when they start out! But by suffering through these experiments, you'll have learned these things the hard way, which to me means that you have learned them better.

    When one of your friends, who always follows the instructions, eventually has something go wrong, you'll be able to say, "Ok, let's test it like so and see what went wrong." Your friends will say "HOW did you know to do that?" and they'll think you're a genius.

    The important thing, to me, is that you have fun learning how the things work. And try to make your screw-ups when there's nothing at stake. Good luck.

  5. #15

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    film or paper is not fixed and will go yellow or change in time and you will not like it. Rewet and fix, wash, dry

  6. #16
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    I want to SHOUT out my two cents (and sense) about the DANGER inherent in the glacial stuff. As far as I am concerned it should not even be sold. Even SMELLING it is DANGEROUS. Please HEED, - David Lyga

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Lyga View Post
    I want to SHOUT out my two cents (and sense) about the DANGER inherent in the glacial stuff. As far as I am concerned it should not even be sold. Even SMELLING it is DANGEROUS. Please HEED, - David Lyga
    Yes, indeed! It's very nasty stuff. Long ago I bought a cheap gallon of glacial acetic acid, and diluted it to about 2% for disposable stop bath. Since it had no indicator to show when it was exhausted, it was disgarded after use. Kodak Indicator Stop Bath would have been more economical, and much more pleasant to use.

  8. #18

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    So you are actually not told by the label on the chemical but rather "smells" out that is glacial acetic acid. And "It might have some sodium thiosulfate in it, for all I know."

    Scientifically we actually don't know for sure if it is the glacial acetic acid, or some other chemical mix.

    If it works as a fixer, it probably IS NOT glacial acetic acid.


    Quote Originally Posted by technowizard12 View Post
    It's part of a set of chemicals that came with a pinhole camera kit. I'm fairly certain that it's glacial acetic acid, since it smells overwhelmingly of vinegar, and I'm not allergic to it. Plus, it burns like hell. It might have some sodium thiosulfate in it, for all I know.

    At any rate, paper I fixed with it a year ago is still as badly printed as it was the day I made it.

  9. #19

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    If I had to start over I would have used citric acid all along. Aceitic acid is a component of acid hardening fixers. In High School we had the chemistry teacher order the chemicals needed for making film and paper developer. While sodium thiosulfate was inexpensive enough it was just easier to buy fixer which was already made up. There were no T-MAX films then so we used mostly regular Kodak Fixer. Today, using odorless fixer and citric acid based stop bath can make developing and printing more pleasant. This is not a replacement for adequate ventilation but the old smells are not really necessary any longer.

  10. #20

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    As I mentioned on another thread acetic acid has its own built-in indicator, its smell. Sodium acetate has little or no smell. So when your stop bath loses its strong vinegar odor it's exhausted. If anyone thinks that this is a strange idea ask yourself what colorblind chemists do. They use indicators that emit an odor once a certain pH is reached.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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