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  1. #21

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    For the record, I wear a charcoal respirator no matter what kind of fixer I'm working with. I'm deathly allergic to aluminum, so aluminum thiosulfate causes my lungs to close up.

    I know it fixed, since this particular paper tends to turn purple in a matter of minutes if it isn't and is exposed to light.

    Thanks for the testing advice, Bill. That's a great idea!
    "All I can see is starfish, now. Starfish. Starfish everywhere!" -A RISD professor I overheard on a student's design project

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by technowizard12 View Post
    For the record, I wear a charcoal respirator no matter what kind of fixer I'm working with. I'm deathly allergic to aluminum, so aluminum thiosulfate causes my lungs to close up.

    I know it fixed, since this particular paper tends to turn purple in a matter of minutes if it isn't and is exposed to light.

    Thanks for the testing advice, Bill. That's a great idea!
    There is no aluminium in fixer. It contains sodium (slow) or ammonium (rapid) thiosulphate.

    You don't know it's fixed until you did a residual silver test on it. Especially when you're guessing at the chemicals you're using by smell!

  3. #23

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    Glacial acetic acid is not a fixer. Moreover, it is somewhat dangerous to handle and its fumes are not only obnoxious but can be very dangerous when concentrated. Small amounts of acetic acid are sometimes used to acidify fixers so that the hardening agent (usually potassium aluminum sulfate - potassium alum) will work better. The fixing chemical is almost always a thiosulfate - either sodium of ammonium.

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