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  1. #1

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    Glacial Acetic Acid as a Film Fixer

    Hey all,

    I just mixed up some glacial acetic acid (or, near that molarity, at least. I kind of eyeballed it) for fixing some prints. It worked for that, and I'm wondering if there are any guidelines for using it to fix film.

  2. #2

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    Are you sure about that?

    Highly diluted, it can be used as a stop bath, but I've NEVER heard of acetic acid being used as a fixer, film or paper.
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  3. #3

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    Why did you decide to try that? TF5 has almost no odor, and fixes prints just fine. Glacial acetic acid, on the other hand is not something I have any interest in standing around a tray of. That and I have no idea how it would work.

  4. #4

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    I had a news paper years ago call me and said they had to do my B+W print real fast, that I had sent for them to run in the bride section, because it was going bad pretty fast. I checked my fix and it had gone south. Stop will not fix a print. Look at it in a few days and see if you still have anything visible.

    Richard

  5. #5

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    It's part of a set of chemicals that came with a pinhole camera kit. I'm fairly certain that it's glacial acetic acid, since it smells overwhelmingly of vinegar, and I'm not allergic to it. Plus, it burns like hell. It might have some sodium thiosulfate in it, for all I know.

    At any rate, paper I fixed with it a year ago is still as badly printed as it was the day I made it.

  6. #6

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    The confusing thing is, to try and figure out what the fixing time is, I stuck a strip of paper in there to see how long it takes to clear. It never cleared, but the paper fixed in about two minutes.

  7. #7
    Newt_on_Swings's Avatar
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    You have been thinking you have fixed prints with stop bath for over a year? That just boggles my mind... Please do some research or listen to the advice of the people that have posted before me. Get some fixer.

  8. #8

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    Hi technowizard12,

    The previous posters are correct. Acetic acid will NOT remove unexposed and residual silver salts from film or paper. Improper fixing will cause prints and negatives to deteriorate quickly. Acetic (or citric) acid is used as a stop bath (short stop) to neutralise the developer before fixing. If you are unsure of your chemicals, throw them away and buy some new, labelled developer, stop bath and fixer, and use them as recommended by the manufacturers.

    Cheers,
    kevs
    testing...

  9. #9

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    My school doesn't have a darkroom, but we do have a good chem lab. I mix my own from sodium thiosulfate that we have in stock. Usually, I know what I'm doing. I'm just away from school, and had some french-labeled fixer which I found in my closet from a while back.

    I don't like to think I'm as incompetent as this post made me sound.

  10. #10
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    Acetic acid is the main component of vinegar (vinegar is roughly 5% acetic acid by volume). A stop bath will usually consist of about 1-2% of acetic acid and glacial acetic acid is +99%

    Acetic acid stops developer, but it does NOT remove unexposed silver salts from photographic media and render them insensitive to light.

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