Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,940   Posts: 1,585,672   Online: 962
      
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 43
  1. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Live Free or Die
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,567
    Images
    91
    How well things work out if you expose prior to fixer completion depends a little on the specific chems and procedures you're using. For example, if you're using water for stop or no stop, and an alkaline fix, you can get some continued developing in the fix from carry over, and thus, fogging if it's exposed.
    It's less likely if you use an acid stop or fix or both.

    I am usually impatient to see the negs, so I often take a peek after the film has been in the fix for a minute or so. With reasonably fresh fix it's almost cleared by that time and it's theortically pretty safe, but I've never done a rigourous test.

    Fred's procedure in the youtube does work, it's been discussed in here before, and I've done similar things accidentally with no practical damage, YMMV.

    If you use a water stop (i do, for film), it's a good idea to stop for at least 1 minute, with agitation, whether or not you're opening the lid in the fix. It makes your developer timing more definite, and repeatable, and helps the fix to last longer.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    1,056
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Why would a green safelight be any safer than any other colour for inspection?
    The human eye is, on average, most sensitive to the green part of the spectrum so the light can be less bright while you can still see the developed silver against the paler emulsion. All manufacturers who have anything to say about development by inspection recommend a (very) dark green safelight-filter, usually indirectly and for as short a time as possible.

    I vaguely recall reading that the image silver has mostly been developed by the time the inspection is done (last quarter or so of the dev-time) and the dim light does not manage to get past the start of the H&D curve to start to affect other, unaffected/undeveloped crystals. If someone can dig out a reference for that and/or add personal experiences then it would be useful.

    As for fixing in the light - why, what's the advantage? (Except for 'unusual' processing like with the tubes).

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Columbia River Gorge, WA
    Shooter
    8x10 Format
    Posts
    93
    I don't know about you guys, but I go to great lengths to get my photographs, sometimes hiking for miles to get to a suitable location. When I process the film, I do each sheet INDIVIDUALLY in trays to insure perfectly clean negs. What could I possibly gain from shoddy darkroom practices after taking such pains, just to satisfy my curiosity a few moments sooner? It's ludicrous.

  4. #14
    Steve Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Ryde, Isle of Wight
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    8,718
    Images
    122
    Quote Originally Posted by M Stat View Post
    What could I possibly gain from shoddy darkroom practices after taking such pains, just to satisfy my curiosity a few moments sooner? It's ludicrous.
    It's only shoddy and ludicrous if it causes any problems. If it doesn't, then it isn't.


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  5. #15
    desertrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Boise, ID
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    202
    Images
    10
    Quote Originally Posted by MartinP View Post
    The human eye is, on average, most sensitive to the green part of the spectrum so the light can be less bright while you can still see the developed silver against the paler emulsion. All manufacturers who have anything to say about development by inspection recommend a (very) dark green safelight-filter, usually indirectly and for as short a time as possible.

    I vaguely recall reading that the image silver has mostly been developed by the time the inspection is done (last quarter or so of the dev-time) and the dim light does not manage to get past the start of the H&D curve to start to affect other, unaffected/undeveloped crystals. If someone can dig out a reference for that and/or add personal experiences then it would be useful.

    As for fixing in the light - why, what's the advantage? (Except for 'unusual' processing like with the tubes).
    Another reason for using a green safelight is I believe many of the older panchromatic emulsions had a reduced sensitivity to green light. I don't know if this is still true today.
    Happiness is a load of bulk chemicals, a handful of recipes, a brick of film and a box of paper. - desertrat

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    12,955
    Images
    60
    Even if there is undeveloped silver in the film when you turn the lights on, if there is no developer left in or on the film and the film does not subsequently contact developer, the fixer will remove those crystals anyways.

    So essentially this will work perfectly, if the stop is far enough along to have neutralized or removed all of the developer.
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Southern California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    13,956
    Quote Originally Posted by Leigh B View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by SkipA View Post
    For film, I do the process through complete fixing without exposure to light.
    Same here.

    - Leigh
    Same here.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  8. #18
    Leigh B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Maryland, USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,035
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    It's only shoddy and ludicrous if it causes any problems.
    But you don't know, beforehand or afterwards, if it did or will cause problems.

    It's shoddy and ludicrous, not to mention unnecessary, in all cases.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  9. #19
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,214
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Even if there is undeveloped silver in the film when you turn the lights on, if there is no developer left in or on the film and the film does not subsequently contact developer, the fixer will remove those crystals anyways.

    So essentially this will work perfectly, if the stop is far enough along to have neutralized or removed all of the developer.
    I have turned on the lights on paper once it's in the (acid - citric acid based in my case) stop and can detect no fog whatsoever. It will eventually, but takes a long time, many minutes at least, possibly hours. Film of course may be another matter. I haven't tried that and see no reason to try it since it isn't needed in my methods.

    I do check the film half way through the fix step when using regular tanks to ensure it has cleared. This is safe. If it had not cleared I would recheck it every 30 seconds then fix for double the clearing time, but I'm pretty conservative on my usage of fixer and don't push the capacity so I've never actually found it not cleared in half the planned time. Since I use a Jobo for most of my film I don't do this, but I do test fixer capacity with a snip of film leader and check clearing time.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    127.0.0.1
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    604
    I fix a piece of film leader in a beaker with the light on before processing my film to determine the clearing time. Then I know exactly how long to fix my film; I just double the clearing time. That saves me from having to check it during processing.

Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin