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  1. #41

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    Film loses some, but not all, of its sensitivity during development. If you expose it to light while any residual developer remains, it will fog - maybe not a lot, but some. Even if development is well stopped and the film is rinsed, exposure to light will darken the remaining silver, which is similar to fogging. That darkening is silver metal, and it will not be removed by the fixer. If the negative is on a reel or in some sort of holder that cast shadows, the fogging will form a pattern on the film. While turning on the lights after a stop bath may sort of work, it is much better to keep the film in the dark until it is fully fixed.

  2. #42
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post
    Ralph Lambrecht has some interesting thoughts on fixing paper for more than two minutes (fiber paper), causing a scenario of making it impossible to actually wash it out of the paper.
    Good argument for using a clearing agent to change the chemical to one more soluble, rather than relying on a simple wash.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  3. #43

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    Early panchromatic films did not have full red sensitivity. They would best be described as ortho chromatic with some red sensitivity. It all depends on which sensitizing dyes are used.

    Our species evolved under a leafy forest canopy where green light predominated. So our eyes are more sensitive to the green portion of the spectrum. This also accounts for why we see more shades of green than any other color.
    Last edited by Gerald C Koch; 08-13-2012 at 04:10 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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