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  1. #1

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    Turning on lights after developer

    I saw a YouTube video from The View Camera Store where Fred is demonstrating the use of BTZS tubes for processing sheet film. He removes the film out of the tube after developer and processes in stop and fix in room light.

    Is this advisable? What are the risks? Fred states in the comments that nearly all of the light sensitivity of the film is gone after development, but I have personally seen my prints (test strips mostly) fade away after taking them out of the Dektol to inspect in room light.

    I use a Yankee Agitank and it takes a bit of time to dump and fill it, it would be helpful to not have to worry too much about total darkness after I develop (mostly Rodinal stand developing with Foma 100, but some FP4/Delta 100 with Rodinal as well). Not saying I would turn on every light in the house, but I could at least take off the tank lid for the stop and fix steps and agitate by dip-and-dunk using dim ambient lighting.

  2. #2

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    Ive had the same result with paper in Ilford developer. I dont use stop - just a quick water rinse at most - and go straight to fixer. I'll usually pop the top of my tank after 1.5 - 2 minutes (I use HP Combi tanks for sheet film and Paterson System 4 for roll) and take a quick peek before putting it back in for the rest of the fix.

    Dan

  3. #3
    Athiril's Avatar
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    I always stop first if I want to inspect.

  4. #4
    Kevin Caulfield's Avatar
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    Always stop then at least a few minutes of fix before lights on.

  5. #5
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brofkand View Post
    I saw a YouTube video from The View Camera Store where Fred is demonstrating the use of BTZS tubes for processing sheet film. He removes the film out of the tube after developer and processes in stop and fix in room light.
    He does that so you won't realize how ridiculous that system is. You need to do the stop bath and fix in darkness, and trying to change
    chemicals with that tube system in the dark would be almost impossible.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  6. #6
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fotoguy20d View Post
    I dont use stop
    Why not?

    Quote Originally Posted by Fotoguy20d View Post
    I'll usually pop the top of my tank after 1.5 - 2 minutes and take a quick peek before putting it back in for the rest of the fix.
    Why?

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  7. #7

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    For film, I do the process through complete fixing without exposure to light. The only exception is for brief exposure to dark green #3 safelight when doing DBI with sheet film in trays. Otherwise, I see no reason to turn on the lights (tray processing) or open the tanks before it is time to clear and wash.

    For paper, I often turn on the room lights once fixing is half complete. For test strips, I don't bother fixing completely since I'm not going to keep them.

  8. #8
    Leigh B's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipA View Post
    For film, I do the process through complete fixing without exposure to light.
    Same here.

    - Leigh
    “Wise men talk because they have something to say; fools, because they have to say something.” - Plato

  9. #9

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    Same, especially if one uses a water stop traces of developer in the material being developed can cause a problem... But if it is something crucial its best not to do it at all. My one exception would be dev. by inspection... Develop, stop then view with green safelight for a moment, then if you need more development put it back in the developer. It reduces chances of fog from the safelight.

  10. #10
    Steve Smith's Avatar
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    Why would a green safelight be any safer than any other colour for inspection?


    Steve.

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