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  1. #1

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    BW processing with warm water

    Anybody has data for developing with warm water? This summer my water temp is 30C and I prefer not to ask my fridge for a help. I tried 5 minutes developing 120 size Ilford FP125 with HC110 and the result is pitch black. I did however accidentally exposed the roll cause I didn't realize that I loaded the tank. But at least there must be some image on it unless I did incorrect timing with development process, right?

  2. #2
    wildbill's Avatar
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    ilford has a time chart available on their website.
    www.vinnywalsh.com

    I know what I want but I just don't know how to go about gettin' it.-Hendrix

  3. #3

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    Ilford has a time/temp compensation chart on their website as wildbill mentioned, and the Massive Dev Chart app (if you have an iPhone or Android phone) will do the compensation for you.

    I generally have to process around 75F in the summer in my climate, sometimes I have to push it to 80F. I love the mid fall/spring time when the water is 68F right out of the spigot.

    You may have problems getting HC110 up to those temperatures without very short development times. General consensus is anything less than 5 minutes is too short. You may have to do a greater dilution like the unofficial Dilution H (see here: http://www.covingtoninnovations.com/hc110/) to get workable processing times.
    Pentax MZ-S, Calumet 4x5 Monorail

    Favorite Films: Foma 100, Acros 100, Delta 400, Portra 400.

  4. #4
    Alan W's Avatar
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    There won't be any images on the film if you exposed it before development-doesn't matter how it was developed.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alan W View Post
    There won't be any images on the film if you exposed it before development-doesn't matter how it was developed.
    +1, and it takes a lot less to totally black out a film than you'd think. I opened my tank and closed it right back (it was open for a split second) in relatively dim room light and it was totally fogged. This was 400 speed film.

    Fortunately, it's a mistake one tends to make very few times in their lives. So far, once was enough for me.
    Pentax MZ-S, Calumet 4x5 Monorail

    Favorite Films: Foma 100, Acros 100, Delta 400, Portra 400.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    This summer my water temp is 30C and I prefer not to ask my fridge for a help. I tried 5 minutes developing 120 size Ilford FP125 with HC110 and the result is pitch black.
    Why not temper your developer in a container of ice water?

    Just put some ice and water in a container then place your beaker of developer in the ice water and stir until the temperature is down to where you want it.

    Yes, you can develop film at higher temperatures. Sometimes, when circumstances require, you might have to but, if at all possible, I think it's best to develop as near to the recommended temperatures as possible. As I remember, most companies recommend that developing times be greater than four or five minutes in order to prevent uneven development. The higher the temperature, the faster the film develops. At 30º C, you might be bumping up against than limit.
    Randy S.

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  7. #7

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    Like I said, I prefer not to ask my fridge for help, that means no ice. But the second trial at 5 min still came out dark/over. I might have to dilute more or forced to use ice.

  8. #8

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    86F/30C is a little too hot for my liking. Either use Dilution H and double the time of Dilution B or set the water you need out for a few hours to come to room temperature/use the fridge. Make sure all of your chemicals are at the same temperature, that means use the Ilford method of washing so you can use the same temperature water.

    You should be able to process a few rolls with a gallon of water, maybe less.
    Pentax MZ-S, Calumet 4x5 Monorail

    Favorite Films: Foma 100, Acros 100, Delta 400, Portra 400.

  9. #9
    David Brown's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MFstooges View Post
    Like I said, I prefer not to ask my fridge for help, that means no ice.
    Why? Is this a religious conviction?

    My tap water is about the same temperature as yours (here in Texas). However, you're in luck, since you use a liquid developer, you can mix it at any temp you want. Put a bottle of water in the fridge. Just do it. Tomorrow, you can mix tap water and the cold water from the fridge and get any temp you wish. Half 30 degrees and half 10 degrees will get you (Ta Da) 20 degrees!

    http://www.onlineconversion.com/mixing_water.htm

    Do this for all your chems and wash water. Use the so-called Ilford washing method. http://www.apug.org/forums/forum37/5...sh-method.html

    Then combine this with NOT exposing the film to light and you should get usable negatives.

    Cheers

    EDIT: Brofkand posted essentially the same advice while I was composing mine. There ya are ...

  10. #10

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    There is a problem with developers that contain more than one developig agent. Each developing agent reacts differently toward temperature changes. For example hydroquinone effectively becomes inert below 55oF. So for consistant results one needs to stay within the usual temperature range 68oF to 75oF .
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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