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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Montreal, Canada
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    I would not recommend using a specific developer to reduce film speed. It will not improve image quality. Assuming that the total subject brightness range still fits within the straight line part of TMY's characteristic curve even with 3 stops overexposure, the only compromise versus the "correct" exposure would be a small increase in graininess and a slight reduction in sharpness. And using a speed-losing developer will not really improve either of those characteristics - particularly in the case of Rodinal which yields relatively coarse grain to begin with.

    So to repeat, assuming the total subject brightness range is within the scale of the film even with overexposure (and that would appear to be the case here given the description of subject contrast, and the long straight-line curve of TMY), I'd suggest you use D76 the way you normally would. This will ensure total and local contrast remain normal, and you'll simply have a more dense negative that needs longer printing times. Not a problem.

    In other words, don't pull-process this film (which would reduce contrast) and don't change developers in an attempt to reduce speed. The exposure is already on the film. Use it.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Downers Grove Illinois
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    1,052
    I always tell people to make the same error on a fresh roll and use it for practice.

    I use D76, but most developers are -20% for one stop over.

  3. #13
    c6h6o3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
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    TMY has about the longest scale of any film you can buy, way longer than any paper you'll ever print on. Unlike HP5+, which has a relatively abrupt shoulder, TMY's characteristic curve is straight as a die out to a density of way over 2.0. Overexposure will just slide the tonal range up the straight line portion of the curve without clipping. When using roll film and an incident meter I rate my TMY at 100. You should be fine.
    Jim

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    35mm
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    31
    Thanks for all the advice. I ended up using HC-110 with dilution B. 5.5 min at 20 c. (Normal Processing). The negatives look a little dense but seem to scan well.

    Click image for larger version. 

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