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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Peak District, Derbyshire, UK
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    I built a darkroom lower than drain level and it was pretty easy to adapt a washing machine pump to remove the water if you match the bore of the pipe to what the pump can handle. You could add a switch in the system downstream of the 'U' bend to automatically turn the pump on when the water in the pipe gets to a certain level.

    Steve
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/steve_barnett/

    book
    wood, water, rock,
    landscape photographs in and around the Peak District National Park, UK.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
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    1,338
    I once rigged the wash outflow from a processing machine into a big plastic garbage can (Rubbermaid "Brute"). From there, a submersible sump pump was PVC-piped into the modified cleanout of a drainpipe. It was temporary, but it served flawlessly for a few months. The cleanout was several feet above the garbage can catch basin. The little sump pump was an amazing thing, very quick and powerful.

    Peter Gomena

  3. #13
    polyglot's Avatar
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    Jun 2009
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    South Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by pgomena View Post
    I once rigged the wash outflow from a processing machine into a big plastic garbage can (Rubbermaid "Brute"). From there, a submersible sump pump was PVC-piped into the modified cleanout of a drainpipe. It was temporary, but it served flawlessly for a few months. The cleanout was several feet above the garbage can catch basin. The little sump pump was an amazing thing, very quick and powerful.

    Peter Gomena
    In the same vein, aquarium and garden fountain pumps are often pretty cheap and capable of significant flow rates. You'll need a separate float valve to control them.

    Next step up is a 12V automatic bilge pump designed for boat use, the float valve is built in and you can clamp a corrugated plastic washing machine drain hose straight onto the outlet. Often designed for saltwater use, so they're all-plastic and should be safe for photochemistry.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    127.0.0.1
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    My darkroom is a converted bedroom, and there was no water or drainage in it originally. I had a plumber route hot and cold water into the room through copper pipe in the attic. He installed a drain pump under my sink. It's an electric sump pump in a sealed bucket that is actuated by a float, sort of like what Trond made, but more compact. I had them route the 1.5 inch effluent pipe into the wall under the sink between two studs and then up into the attic, across to the other side of the house, and down to the main drain stack by the washing machine. They had to dig down several feet under the foundation to tie in the drain so as to prevent any siphoning of sewage. I've been running that way now for 10 years or 12 years, with no problem.

    Installation wasn't cheap, but it was worth it.

    It is the Zoeller model 53, number 105-0010.

  5. #15
    Randy Moe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Midwest USA
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    Thanks for all the ideas. I finally found a working drain under the water heater. I did not think it worked since AC condensation was leaking onto the floor and not down the hidden drain. I need a mirror to see it. Ran a garden hose down it for 2 hours and it seems to flow enough.

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