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  1. #11

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    Since I often freeze my film I use freezer tape since it maintains its hold even at low temperatures. Another reason because it is intended for food storage I assume that there is nothing to affect the film.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  2. #12

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    I remember when you got a free re-loadable cassette every time you bought a roll of Ilford 35mm B&W film. They came in re-loadable cassettes. Guess it's been awhile since I reloaded 35mm film.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gerald C Koch View Post
    Since I often freeze my film I use freezer tape since it maintains its hold even at low temperatures. Another reason because it is intended for food storage I assume that there is nothing to affect the film.
    Interesting, is this a easy to get item or something I order from a specialty store?

    I think I am just going to load it my self, I am pretty sure I have two loaders already.

  4. #14

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    Indeed, bulk loading yourself for Xpan use will let you crank a few extra frames so you can get 21 shots vs 20. I've never gotten 20 out of factory loaded Kodak.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by canuhead View Post
    Indeed, bulk loading yourself for Xpan use will let you crank a few extra frames so you can get 21 shots vs 20. I've never gotten 20 out of factory loaded Kodak.
    It has varied for me, 20-21. I just found my loader, it is a brand new Watson with 50 new metal Kalt cans.

  6. #16
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
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    I think the Watson is the best. It doesn't touch the film unless the gate is closed. I second the used cassettes from the minilab idea. It is the easiest and fastest way to go. I have been hording them because you never know. I use Scotch tape these days and it works fine, no overlap. I just butt the film against the small tongue left over coming out of the cartridge. Six clicks past one full revolution on the Watson is what I do which gives me 38-40ish frames. The last frame is usually semi fogged. Do some trials and you will know where it lies for you in the count. Until then assume your last frame is no good.

    The last thing to do is put on a good movie and go........ Beer helps too.

  7. #17

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    Instead of using a bulk loader, consider a simple crank in a dark room: http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subsc...ad%20bulk.html

    Contrary to others' advice, I really WOULDN'T recycle mini-lab cassettes that have been swilling round in a bin. ONE scratch is too many.

    What camera(s) are you using? Consider camera-specific cassettes Shirley-Wellards: http://www.rogerandfrances.com/subsc...0cassetes.html

    Cheers,

    R.
    Free Photography Information on My Website
    http://www.rogerandfrances.com

  8. #18
    limnidytis's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aristotle80 View Post
    You don't have to buy a single reloadable cassette if you have a source for empty factory cassettes. Scour your city's one hour labs and take the empty film cassettes after the color film has been cut off for processing. It's trash to the lab, so if you ask nicely they will happily give you all they have. Then pick over the empty cassettes, discarding any that have dirt, dents, or damaged felt light traps. Then, using your bulk loader, you can simply use masking tape to splice your fresh film onto the little stub of color film they leave sticking out the slot. You need to make the connection pretty flat so it slips in without jamming.
    I've used film bulk loaded (by someone else) into previously used cassettes, and while generally it works well, there are a few issues which I believe are related to the splice between the bulk film and the left over film in the cassette. I believe the splice must occupy some of the space in the cassette - enough so that the person that loaded the film says he can't get a full 36 exp into a standard cassette. When I've used the film in an auto wind camera (EOS 1v - no manual wind), the film will sometimes stop advancing after a few frames - I've never had this happen with a standard bulk cassette. Again, I think that the splice takes up space in the cassette and puts extra tension on the film so the camera thinks it's at the end of the roll. Once I had the film jam at the end of the roll in my 1v because the splice was pulled out of the light trap and the camera would not rewind the film. I had to put the camera in a changing bag to take the film out. Also, at least with the film I used, more film is pulled out of the bulk loader to make the splice - so there's more exposed film at the end of the roll which can overlap the last frame. All of these problems are likely related to how the splice is made. Your results may vary, but it's a few things to consider.

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