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Thread: Flat Fiber

  1. #11
    David A. Goldfarb's Avatar
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    I do it just before mounting, and if the prints are in an environment where there is humidity that can get into the frame, they will curl again eventually.
    flickr--http://www.flickr.com/photos/davidagoldfarb/
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  2. #12
    rbarker's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David Ruby
    . . . For those of you who do the hot press method, do you do this just prior to mounting? . . .
    Yes, that's how I use mine mostly - flattening just before hinge mounting. Even after flattening, the prints will regain some curl after just a few hours (sometimes, minutes!), depending on humidity.
    [COLOR=SlateGray]"You can't depend on your eyes if your imagination is out of focus." -Mark Twain[/COLOR]

    Ralph Barker
    Rio Rancho, NM

  3. #13
    Loose Gravel's Avatar
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    I have dry mounted for years. It is certainly nice, but not necessary and now I believe that storing all that matt board is a problem. It is also done that you just flatten the best you can under a book or whatever and then mount to matt board with corners and then over matt, hinging the two matts together. When you do this, it is nice to have a big boarder on your print. I've seen this done up to 16x20 prints.
    Watch for Loose Gravel

  4. #14
    Flotsam's Avatar
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    I have some hinged-under-the-matt prints framed on my wall and it always annoys me to see how the slightest bit of glare shows that tiny bit of waviness in the loose print. I've always loved the look of a dry mounted print and since the trendy galleries aren't likely to come beating down my door anyway, well... screw 'em.

    Just a matter of personal taste.
    That is called grain. It is supposed to be there.
    =Neal W.=

  5. #15

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    David,
    Try these two things.
    1 Dry your prints in pairs, back to back, hanging on a mini "cloths line". Put clothes pegs every two inches round the edges. They will dry flatter like this than if just left flat.
    2 You will notice that most of the curl in a dry print is near the edges. If you print with at least a half inch border then trim about a quarter of an inch off all edges of your print, you will have cut most of the curl off, and it will be quite flat enough for mounting.

    I actually like to see a bit of unevenness in a mounted, framed print. It makes it look like a hand made rather than a mass-produced object.

    Alan Clark

  6. #16

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    I would just echo that sentiment. I recently sold my dry mount press. I think that the trend is away from dry mounting for exhibition work, and hinge mounting with a matte board overly and glass on top of that and the springs in the Neilsen frame assembly keep the entire thing nicely flat. Furthermore, I do not feel terribly comfortable putting my lovely air-dried fiber prints in a dry mounting press. It's unnatural. Like curling your hair with a hot curling iron.

  7. #17

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    I sympathize entirely. Prints should receive TLC.
    I use a blotter stack made up of non-woven hydrophobic
    separator sheets and ventilation class corrugatd board.
    The stack does dry and flatten.

    Do you think there is a size limit for hinge mounting? Have
    you considered corner mounting? Dan

  8. #18
    David Ruby's Avatar
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    I've never done it, but I'm more inclined to hinge mount rather than dry mount myself. Something about the flexibility of having the print not really attached to something. In my case, most of my stuff is for my own home, so I'd like to be able to possibly swap photos out of frames eventually. Who knows.

    I'll give the hanging to dry method another try. I did it once, after reading about it on Heylloyd.com, but I only pinned two corners and it didn't work too well. I've also been experimenting a bit with how I squeeqy: both sides, only one side, once only, as thouroughly as possibly etc. to see how it might affect that edge curling. No huge breakthroughs yet though!

    I'm currently on the lookout on Ebay for a four bladed easel so I can print with larger borders etc. I'm guessing that it might be nice to print 8x10ish images on 11x14 paper, and smaller prints on the 8x10 paper so you have that flexibility.
    David

  9. #19
    Shmoo's Avatar
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    You might also try letting your prints dry until the print surface is dry, but the back is ever-so-slightly damp, then sandwiching the print between archival matboard and pressing with a book until dry. The prints will dry flat. I've never had a problem corner mounting them with an overmat.

  10. #20
    ldh
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    Another method

    This a method I use often for flattening fiber prints...it was taught to me by a master printer here in Prague...it is however rather labour intensive and finicky...and perhaps not all that practical

    Step1. Take (wet) final print and place on flat clean surface face up.
    Step2. Using a blotter remove excess water from print surface...turn print over and do the same to the backside.
    Step3.allow print to air dry on a mesh screen just to the point when the print has a tacky feel to it.
    Step4. Place Print flat onto a piece of plate glass ensuring that the print is absolutely flat on the glasss.
    Step5. Using 3cm wide brown acid free paper tape, (they call it framers tape here...dont know what it is in other parts of the world) create a paper frame on the print with 1cm covering the each side of the print and 2cm overlapped onto the glass sheet...how you devise to make the tape straight is up to you.
    Step6. let the print "Cure" on the glass sheet for at 24 hours but as long as 48 hours.
    Step7. After the "curing time" cut free the print with an box cutter and trim the print inside the tape.

    The print will be flatter than you have ever experienced before and will remain that way, unless exposed to high humidity for extended periods.

    The print will, however, loose some of its gloss if it is a glossy surface...it will become more of a luster...matte surface will be unchanged.

    I have made a rack with room for 10 sheets of 16x20 glass, so I can cure up to 10 prints per 24 hour period...I even exhibited a set of prints with the brown framers tape still on the print...kind of gave it an organic feel.

    Its definately not for someon who needs to crank out prints, it does work very well, apart from the change of paper surface with glossy papers...I dont like high gloss anyway so its perfect for me.
    s ledem prosim

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