Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 68,682   Posts: 1,482,233   Online: 1110
      
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 17 of 17
  1. #11
    ROL
    ROL is offline
    ROL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    California
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    688
    I'd say this is much ado about nothing, except that it apparently isn't. Papers do tend to stick together until entirely wetted and at least partially saturated (fiber). Devote at least one smooth bottom tray for developing only and prevent the bottom from gouges and scratches, particularly if plastic.

    I develop up to 6 11x14's, 5 16x20's, and 4 20x24's at a time without problems in 28x34 trays. But, there is a method. Normally, dependent on the make of paper, I insert all papers into the developer face down, because of the paper's curl, one at a time, one on top of the other until sufficiently wetted, with constant agitation. Then each paper is turned upside down as the curl relaxes. This is all done with tongs, once in the developer. At this point, all face up, each paper will swim on its own, if agitated, due to the slippery nature of alkali developers. Each print is then withdrawn one at a time into the stop (water), and then fix, watching the clock, first in first out, with constant agitation.

    I recommend tongs, for smaller prints, up to 20x24, unless you can keep your hands very clean, with hand washing between each station. Large size roll paper is developed one at a time, entirely face up, with hands, to prevent the wet, heavy paper from breaks and crimps (self-gripping tongs won't hold).

    Oh, and I almost forgot. Did I mention agitation?



    P.S. Print processing is a technical process, not an artistic enterprise. One can (batch) process as many as possible if done with some planning and care. Any paper, fiber or RC, that cannot handle the normal rigors of processing, should either be avoided, if possible, or handled with accordant care.
    Last edited by ROL; 08-20-2012 at 10:43 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: postscript

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,737
    Dear Bob,

    You are speaking to one of the very few Englishmen who consider mushy pea's the food of the devil and to be avoided at all costs!

    I would never trust putting anything in my mouth that was that green, some of this stuff in some places is bordering on flourescent.......

    I do not go in for 'nostalgia' that much but where I was brought up, Cullercoats / Tynemouth in North East England we had some fabulous Fish and Chip shops, and if I am up there I always revisit one in Tynemouth called Marshalls, it was great when I was young and it still is...they never used to sell mushy pea's, but they do now, they will also put curry sause on your chip's, did'nt when I was a lad, well thats progress I suppose, the most exotic it got was when I was young was when they started offering sausages...it got in the local paper ! you also got your food wrapped in that local newspaper, true recycling, and something to read whilst you ate!

    As far as I am concerned, the English contribution to world cuisine is indeed the chip...and a truly noble thing it is done well.

    I fully appreciate any French people reading this may ( with possibly some justification ) may claim 'prior art' in relation to the 'chip'

    Bit of translation required here....

    A Chip is a Chip not a crisp
    A French fry is a posh name for a Chip...



    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  3. #13
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,541
    Images
    14
    good one

  4. #14
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11,577
    Images
    59
    Any thoughts on "Bubble N' Squeak"?
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Cheshire UK
    Shooter
    Medium Format
    Posts
    1,737
    Yup.... very fond of "bubble and squeak".......

    Undoubtedly, the boxing day lunch of cold turkey and B&S is miles better than Christmas day lunch...and a lot less effort, which is why I have been known to don the cooking apron, but only on boxing day, b&s does have some UK regional variations, our 'family' B&S is cold mashed potato's and carrot and neep ( swede ) mixed together roughly then fried with butter salt and pepper, I have seen such abborations as other crushed cold veggies being added ( especially in the south ) in some cases even cabbage and the true veg of the devil... brussel sprouts... if ever a true reason why GM should be allowed to flourish it is to genectically modify the brussel sprout out of existence...truly hideous.

    Is this just the start? ...do we have a new section on APUG? is food the new photography? instead of a Michelin star do we now have the ILFORD star ? or is just August, the silly season...

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  6. #16
    MattKing's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Delta, British Columbia, Canada
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    11,577
    Images
    59
    Simon:

    Must be the Kodak in me - gently steamed brussell sprouts with a touch of butter and lemon are wonderful!

    But don't overcook them!
    Matt

    “Photography is a complex and fluid medium, and its many factors are not applied in simple sequence. Rather, the process may be likened to the art of the juggler in keeping many balls in the air at one time!”

    Ansel Adams, from the introduction to The Negative - The New Ansel Adams Photography Series / Book 2

  7. #17
    Bob Carnie's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Toronto-Ontario
    Shooter
    Med. Format RF
    Posts
    4,541
    Images
    14
    Gently is the key.. My grandmother from Wales boiled them to mush and I detested them for years.
    Quote Originally Posted by MattKing View Post
    Simon:

    Must be the Kodak in me - gently steamed brussell sprouts with a touch of butter and lemon are wonderful!

    But don't overcook them!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin