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  1. #11

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    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by marjolijn View Post
    Thanks guys for your replies. I think I am gonna shoot it, because I am sure I'll never climb the Everest

    ctsundevil, funny how you'd get fine results with cold water! But did you also try to develop in dil B and around 20C (68F)?
    Just for a vague reference, I shot some 53 year old (expiration Mar 1956) Ansco Plenachrome Fast Orthochromatic 116 sized film. Developed in HC110 dilution B for 6.5 minutes. Taken with a 1930's Kodak Hawkeye 2B Cassette camera. Old film is a lot of fun! This particular film was very flimsy and curled a lot!

    Here's what I got:



    Last edited by toro_mike; 08-21-2012 at 05:02 PM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: Added dilution

  2. #12

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    Mar 2008
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    Connecticut
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    I did try developing a roll at 68F, it was the first one I tried and it came out jet black. That's why I tried using the low temp developer. It was a hassle, but the results were better.

  3. #13

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    oeh! I like those effects!

    Thanks, I will let you know about the results!

  4. #14

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    Your Gevaert roll probably has more aesthetic and monetary value as an antique. I've experimented with Kodak Portrait Panchromatic sheet film from 1959 with an ASA 200 rating, and had to derate it to ASA 5 to obtain a useable image. Any imaginary aesthetic added-value from the base fog was more than offset by the film's sheet-to-sheet unpredictablilty, and surface ripple and 'artifacts' that had formed on the film over the years. If you want special aesthetics, maybe you are better off using Photoshop.

    If your roll had images on it, I would definitely take a chance on developing the images.
    [FONT="Arial"][/FONT]John Weinland

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