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Thread: HELP!

  1. #1

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    HELP!

    I'm using a Exa 1b camera with a Carl Zeiss Jena 50mm F2.6 Tessar lens.
    I've just got back to Sweden and I only have a Kodak TX400 film to hand. Is every shot going to be pretty much completely overexposed? Shutter speed only goes up to 1/175 and I like the use of focus, I wouldn't want to take everything on F-22.

    Many thanks,
    Will.
    Exa 1B with a Tessar 2.8/50 Carl Zeiss Jena DDR.

    "In order to comfort Amélie, her mother gives her a second-hand Kodak. A neighbour makes her believe that her camera causes accidents to happen. Since she's been taking pictures all afternoon, Amélie finds herself in deep worry in the evening. She collapses in front of the television, feeling guilty for a fire, derailments and the crash of a Boeing."

  2. #2

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    Dear Will,

    An orange filter or a polarizing filter will get you a stop. A dark red filter will get you two stops. If it is very bright and contrasty you can always over expose and under develop buying you a stop.

    Good luck!

    Neal Wydra

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Neal View Post
    Dear Will,

    An orange filter or a polarizing filter will get you a stop. A dark red filter will get you two stops. If it is very bright and contrasty you can always over expose and under develop buying you a stop.

    Good luck!

    Neal Wydra
    Thank you very much! Very helpful 35mm photography here is a VERY expensive hobby! So any waste is a costly one! Thank you again,
    Will.
    Exa 1B with a Tessar 2.8/50 Carl Zeiss Jena DDR.

    "In order to comfort Amélie, her mother gives her a second-hand Kodak. A neighbour makes her believe that her camera causes accidents to happen. Since she's been taking pictures all afternoon, Amélie finds herself in deep worry in the evening. She collapses in front of the television, feeling guilty for a fire, derailments and the crash of a Boeing."

  4. #4
    David Lyga's Avatar
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    Even in the USA film is expensive. Our dollar is very depressed. You might consider doing this:

    I NEVER load 35mm film like we are supposed to load it with a wasteful leader. First, I cut off the leader. Then, I open my empty SLR and put a piece of tape, about 2 inches (4 cm?) onto the take up spool and slowly advance the film advance lever to wrap the tape around it. When fully 'advanced' there should be about one inch (2 cm) sticking out.

    In the dark, I then place the film cassette into its chamber, push down the rewind crank to keep the cassette in place, and draw out enough film to reach just past the sproket holes. I anchor the film's lower sprocket hole onto the sprocket with my thumb to keep it from falling off. I then take the exposed piece of tape and carefully place its sticky side underneath the middle portion of the film, press firmly to make it stick, then make sure that the other sprocket hole is engaged with the film. Finally, I make sure that the film is secure and taut before I close the SLR's body. If done properly, (practice in room light with dummy film) the film will then advance properly. Your first exposure is ready to take since you cocked the shutter as you were putting on the tape. You have wasted about one frame of film. Of course, the removal of the leader negates the economy here if you intend to shool the whole roll you are best loading normally, as you have saved nothing. But, read on...

    WillMcC: this solves two problems.

    First, you are no longer held hostage to taking the full roll of film. To remove what you want to remove you, again in the dark, open the back of the SLR and cut off the film just past the last frame taken. (This will be just to the left of the aperture window if you have not advanced to the next frame or just before the right side of the aperture window if you have already advanced to the next frame.) In sum, you want to waste as little film as possible. You are free with this method to take, maybe, five frames and you will have used only about seven frames of film stock in order to do this.

    Second: you now have the ability to buy expired film and be able to use it without wondering whether or not it is OK and how many stops extra exposure you need. You make a simple 'clip test' by taping about one inch or unexposed film onto the film aperture and shooting a predicable, repeatable scene for which you already know the correct light value. (I use my bookcase because it has both hightlights (white plastic items in front) and shadows (empty space where the overhead light does not reach well) to make my very accurate determination as to how the rest of the roll will be both exposed and processed.

    My way takes a bit of frustration to anchor the film securely but the two advantages just elicited are worth the effort. Some time ago I waxed about the high cost of film and, as could be predicted with so many having good jobs and income, was met with general dismay ("film is NOT expensive", "you are complaining too much", "there are worse things out there", etc.). To that I say: sorry, film is very expensive in the USA. Film is utterly ridiculous in Europe (with VAT). My way allows full value to be achieved. You get to use one 36 exposure roll as, almost, a bulk roll and you get to feel confident with buying expired film because you get to test first. For many this thread will come off as rather trivial and too parsimonious. But for many out there it could possibly be a valuable cost saving device. - David Lyga

  5. #5
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
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    I would like to recommend the use of Neutral Density filters. I fail to understand why they are not more widely used. It used to be that I liked using Ilford FP4+ and Tri-X 400 side by side. Prints from these films, side by side, look (to my eye) remarkably similar once the films have been developed to an equal contrast. Of course at larger magnification the superior sharpness and grain quality of FP4+ shines through, but tonality wise and making pictures in a series look similar or the same it is a very good combination.

    Now I use only Tri-X 400 and if I need wider apertures I just use a Neutral Density filter. A 2 stop filter will give you the same speed as when normally shooting FP4+. Easy peasy. Two films in one. If your camera is a rangefinder it gets even better, because you don't have to look through the ND filter as you focus or compose.
    Last edited by Thomas Bertilsson; 08-22-2012 at 09:36 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  6. #6

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    Hi Will,

    A point to bear in mind is that an ND filter won't change the tonality of B+W film, whereas a coloured filter will. Polarisers are great but sometimes you don't want that effect and revolving the filter each time can be a faff. 'Pulling' will lower the film's contrast, which you may not want either. Different tools, different effects - go with the ones you prefer.

    David's loading method sounds like a faff too - careful loading will allow 37 to 40 frames from a 36 exp. roll (depending on how generous Kodak is these days!) from a manual SLR - with an autoloader all bets are off! YMMV, of course.

    Cheers,
    kevs.
    testing...

  7. #7
    cliveh's Avatar
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    How about a double polarizing filter, which will give you an infinite variation of ND.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

  8. #8

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    wait for cloudy days?

    -- actually, i shot some tri-x in that very combination not so long ago, a 1/175th at f-16 is not over exposing at all except in brightest sunlight -- film latitude will save your butt, and how often is it as bright as can be anyway?

  9. #9
    K-G
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    Quote Originally Posted by summicron1 View Post
    wait for cloudy days?
    This summer in Sweden you don't even need to wait.

    Karl-Gustaf
    Karl-Gustaf Hellqvist

    www.heliochroma.com

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by K-G View Post
    This summer in Sweden you don't even need to wait.

    Karl-Gustaf
    Tell me about it! I'm here, moaning and worrying about over exposure and it's as dark as anything outside! Rain all week, I best get shooting! Thanks all for your help, I'm going to shoot with it and just be very conscious of overexposure.

    Thank you all,
    Will!
    Exa 1B with a Tessar 2.8/50 Carl Zeiss Jena DDR.

    "In order to comfort Amélie, her mother gives her a second-hand Kodak. A neighbour makes her believe that her camera causes accidents to happen. Since she's been taking pictures all afternoon, Amélie finds herself in deep worry in the evening. She collapses in front of the television, feeling guilty for a fire, derailments and the crash of a Boeing."



 

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