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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by RalphLambrecht View Post
    how close are the printers?.
    6 to 10 meters. No direct air flow between printer and photos.

    I should/would try toning...it's just the wait period to see any effect is a bit long

  2. #12

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    You could also use Sistan, this leaves pretty much no change to the image apart from the protective effects. It does seem an extraordinarily short time for degradation to set in. There isn't some crazy cleaner wiping the prints twice a week with table-polish, or something like that??!

  3. #13

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    Hello,
    the yellowing comes from oxidation of the image silver caused by UV irradiation, ozone or other harmful substances from the environment. Often this occurs with images which are opposed to light in a frame under glas, possibly even with a simple back carton board or a MDF plate who are not archive stable. The cellulose layer of a classic baryt FB paper can absorb and neutralize such environment poisons, the polymer layer of a RC paper is a barrier the substances cannot penetrate. The oxidation products of the silver (silver oxide, silver hydroxide, silverperoxide) are better soluble than metallic silver mobile and can migrate to the top of the emulsion layer. Sometimes there occurs a re-reduction to a mirror like silver. You can prevent this, as already has been said, by selenium toning, sulfur toning or by application of AGFA Sistan. Sistan contains potassiumthiocyanate which forms higly insoluble silverthiocyanate which is immobilized in the emulsion and prevents to migrate. Sulfur toning gives a more or less brown image, selenium does not affect the image tone as much, it becomes a little cooler to violet, Sistan does not affect the image tone at all.

  4. #14

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    Dear Jochen,

    You are quite correct these can affect prints in the way you say, and I will repeat NOT IN A YEAR not if they are correctly fixed and washed, silver migration ( known as 'blooming' ) can happen under atmospheric polution, but once again, not at the levels experienced in an office, even a printing one.

    In a normal indoor environment you would not see any degradation, whatsover, in a correctly processed monochrome RC print in 5 years, certainly no 'yellowing'

    There is absolutely no need whatsoever to tone an RC print for normal use or lifetime + 75 years unless you wanted a higher level of archival permanance or for aesthetic reasons.

    Simon ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited

  5. #15

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    i've had this happen in my office as well -- the place is lined with carpets and cubicle walls covered with fabric that i suspect is not cotton, and synthetic fabrics all outgas.

    here's the real thing to keep in mind: whatever's doing that to those prints is also entering your lungs, and your bloodstream -- how ya feeling these days?

    i had this happen with prints framed behind plastic sheet instead of glass -- outgassing from plastic is evil, but Simon from Ilford is right, look to thy archival printing methods...

  6. #16
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    Insufficient wash and / or fixer could do it, but a cheap RC paper could also be the culprit. Some RC papers, even today, omit the stabilizers from the RC. Ilford paper would not do this, but some others might.

    It could also be something in the water. You see, we have had a long discussion of this before. The Ilford wash method, (several trays of still water with dumps as opposed to running water for the full time) can fail.

    PE

  7. #17

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    Simon, please don't oversell your product. Yellowing of properly washed rc prints in record time is certainly comon. Happened to me many times. Usually on glossy paper.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    Simon, please don't oversell your product. Yellowing of properly washed rc prints in record time is certainly comon. Happened to me many times. Usually on glossy paper.
    Not with properly processed paper from Ilford or Fuji, or in times gone by, Agfa and Kodak.

    PE

  9. #19

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    Dear NB23

    I never oversell my products, ever:

    I am making a statement of fact, if it yellows within a year, something is wrong with the paper or it is being exposed to airborne pollutants in a higher concentration that you would find in any normal working ( office ) environment, the only time I have ever seen this happen is twice in 25 years on an ILFORD product, once in a hair salon and once in a brewery.

    Simon. ILFORD Photo / HARMAN technology Limited :

  10. #20
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    So, Ooze, what brand did you use?
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

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