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  1. #1

    Join Date
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    Delta 100 at 24ēC? Please advise to a beginner.

    Hi everyone! (my 1st post)

    I develop relatively small amounts of B&W 35mm at home and then scan them.
    For now I don't make analog enlargements, all the processing is in the computer.

    I shoot ILFORD Delta 100 and HP5. I use ID-11 for everything, because I'm still learning. I may eventually switch to Kodak D-76 which is cheaper here.

    I live in Chicago, and especially in the summer, I discovered that developing at 20ēC is an issue.
    The interior air temperature is 23ēC or more and trying to maintain 20ēC developer is impractical. I'd much more prefer to develop at 24ēC - this is my cold tap water temperature anyways (around 23.5ēC).
    Delta 100 packaging only lists 20ēC times at 1+0 or 1+1 ID-11 solution.

    QUESTION for you guys: what are the ramifications of switching to developing Delta 100 at 24ēC (1+1 or 1+3)?
    24ēC would be like 7.5 minutes in 1+1, does it make sense to switch to 1+3 and extend the time?

    On Delta 100, I'd like to keep the grain as small as possible, as well as maintain smooth contrast, because I prefer to adjust contrast in digital post-processing.
    Can you share your wisdom?

    Thank you!
    --
    Matt (35mm B&W processing beginner)

  2. #2

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    Try a tub of water and a few icecubes to cool it down, put a bottle of developer in the fridge to cool it down as well. Much easier than keeping C41 processing at +/- a half degree at almost 100F.
    Bob

  3. #3
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    24ēC isn't a problem if that's close to the ambient/water temperature then it's fine. When I'm in Turkey I processat up to 27ēC, messing around with ice is a waste of time, I can process within +/- 0.2ēC by working to the ambient temperature with no effort.

    Just remember to compensate the development time for the temperature difference and then keep to that temperature throughout the rest of the processing & washing. (I use Delta 100 & 400).

    Ian

  4. #4
    dehk's Avatar
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    - Derek
    [ Insert meaningless camera listing here ]

  5. #5

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    Thank you very much all of you guys!
    I have the adjustment chart printed, and I have messed around with ice cubes in a small tub. But developing at ambient temp was what I really wanted to do.

    Johnielvis, you explained to me exactly what I wanted to know. I will try to do both 1+1 and 1+3 and see which one is better for scanning in the end.

    One last thing, does more dilution + longer time impact the grain by a significant margin in my case?
    --
    Matt (35mm B&W processing beginner)

  6. #6
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    There's more grain at 1+3 than FS or 1+1 but sharpness improves, however for scanning that's less important than fine grain.

    Ian

  7. #7

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    The time compensation data comes with the packet of developer. It is also available on the Ilford website - looks like someone has already posted the link. Using the developer at 1:1 will make the time a little longer and minimise any problems with dev times that are too short for consistency. Experimentation should be minimal as Ilford have already worked it out for you.

  8. #8
    RalphLambrecht's Avatar
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    grain increases with development time.that said. it's never a good idea to change more than one variable when testing the impact one influence.
    Regards

    Ralph W. Lambrecht
    www.darkroomagic.comrorrlambrec@ymail.com[/URL]
    www.waybeyondmonochrome.com

  9. #9

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    Aug 2012
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    I totally appreciate all your answers and time. I know that certain knowledge comes from experience but a little "practical theory" won't hurt.
    After shooting film for 7 years I moved to digital for 8 more and now I'm back, this time on a more serious level.
    Thank you!

  10. #10

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    Developing at 24C will give more grain than developing at 20C. I would go for the ice in the tub method. I have done this for tap water temperatures of 30+ with good success. You only need to keep it constant for the development, after that if it slowly drifts up it is not an issue.

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