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  1. #1
    lacavol's Avatar
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    Kodak RPC rapid process copy

    I'll buy almost anything under $20, I even have a pet rock who hasn't shown any interest in photography after all these years.

    So I bought 20 rolls of RPC for $20. Expiration date 1991, what's a couple of decades. I went out and shot one roll, but only a couple of photo's show any detail and they are rather like film noir.Since it said Rapid Process I developed in HC110 1:50 for 7 minutes and they are to my suprise positives, though the sky had the only detail. It was Sunny16 light and the two I shot that came out were about 5 seconds at f1.4 on a 50mm lens. The developer, fix, etc. was good as I used the same chemicals to develop a roll of Pan F Plus right after and it came out fine.

    I suspect that Very Slow in the film description is something I don't quite comprehend. I would think it is at least 5 stops slower than my light meter at ISO6. Maybe open the shutter and sing the Jeopardy song and then close it or carry a stopwatch, how do you do really long exposures.

    Any suggestions, speculations? More time - More Development?

    I've found all the old threads and they helped for a start, but no one ever posted if they got results.

  2. #2
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    It is a 0.06 iso film in fluorescent light, direct positive film. I have a few rolls also and did some research about the film. Found a article with exposure times using speeds of a iso 100 film as refrence. If the shutter speed for a iso 100 film is 1/60 (at selected aperture), for Kodak RPCF is 30s. If 1/125 (100), RPC is 15s, etc.
    Kodak DK-50 is the developer for this kind of film, but do not know if it is the only one indicated for. I used rodinal 1+10 4m, and XTOL 1:1 5 m, the last give some positive results.
    KenS, a fellow foruner, help me and give me a dk-50 formula, but I did not had the time yet for doing the developer and using the film.

  3. #3
    lacavol's Avatar
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    Thanks, looks like I'll have to get a stop watch. Don't have any XTOL either so I have to get some, or maybe I will retry HC110 @ Dil B for about 7 minutes as my problem was it didn't take enough silver away. I do have Rodinal. It's not worth mixing chemicals at the moment. With sunny16 light at 15 sec. I'll try some bracketing.

  4. #4
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    With rodinal I did not get positive, but negatives, a strange thing. And the negatives were full of contrast and hight density.

  5. #5

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    Here’s a copy of the instruction sheet packed with the film. The developing information is sparse.

    KODAK Rapid Process Copy Film

    A direct reversal film used for simplified production of back-and-white slides of radiographs, black-and-white transparencies, and black-and-white reflection copy.

    Safelight: Handle this blue-sensitive film under the light of a GBX-2 Safelight Filter, or equivalent, in a suitable safelight lamp containing a 15-watt bulb, placed at least 4 feet (1.2m) from the film.

    Storage: Store unprocessed film in a refrigerator or freezer at a temperature of 50° F (10° C) or lower. Keep film dry and shielded from x-rays, gamma rays, or other penetrating radiation. Process film as soon as possible after exposure.

    Exposure: 0.06 with the fluorescent light commonly found in x-ray view boxes.

    Copying Radiographs and Similar Transparencies: Exposure times for “average” radiographs are 12 to 20 seconds at f/4 with a conventional x-ray view box.

    Reflection Copy: With two 500-watt RFL-2 reflector photolamps and 36 inches from center of the copy, try about 12 seconds at f/3.5. If the processed slide is too dark, use a longer exposure time; if too light a shorter time.

    Notice: Caution should be exercised while projecting slides using a high-intensity arc-projector. When certain types of projectors are operated at the maximum lamp-intensity setting, slides may be damaged by excess heat if left in the projection gate for long periods of time. Projectors which have inefficient heat-absorbing devices or restricted air-cooling systems may complicate the problem. Because glass slide mounts trap moist, heated air next to the film, these mounts are not recommended for use with arc projectors.

    Slides produced using KODAK Rapid Process Copy Film are more susceptible to this type of heat damage than are typical color slides, such as those produced on Kodachrome and Ektachrome films. Processed Rapid Process Copy Film contains a metallic silver image which is a more efficient absorber of infrared radiation than the dyes contained in color film emulsions.

    The potential of inflicting heat damage to slides is minimized when projecting under normal conditions. When high-intensity projectors are employed, a simple projection test (using an extra slide) should be conducted to determine a particular projector’s “safe” time limit. It may be necessary to adjust the projector’s light output to prevent damage to the slides.

    Processing: May be processed in KODAK X-Omat Processors with a 90-second or longer cycle or conventional black-and-white chemicals and processors.

  6. #6

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    This film was designed to make positive transparencies of radiographs. I shot it on a copy stand over an x-ray view box. It is also designed to be processed in a rapid x-ray film processor (90 sec end to end, 97 F). Look for identification at the film edge. If you have high-contrast negatives, you don't have RPC. Pictorially handled, the image should be very low contrast and muddy.

    K.

  7. #7
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    My results with Rodinal: http://www.rangefinderforum.com/foru...ad.php?t=91669
    And I have RCP since I have the boxes, the cartiges and the instruction sheet.

  8. #8
    lacavol's Avatar
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    I went out and shot again in the high desert about 2500ft. and got results after talking to Rhodes. I shot pictures in my OM1 using my cellphone as a stopwatch. It was bracketed at 10sec. intervals. My meter read 1/125 at F11 for ISO100. I processed at 6 and 8 minutes in 1+49 HC110, the 6 minutes was less contrast which helped. It was 6min. 1+49 HC110 develop agitate first 30sec. and 5 inversions on the minute thereafter. Kodak indicator Stop 30sec. Eco Pro Neutral fix 1+4 for 5 minutes. Then wash. They came out slides (positives), now I have to remember where my blank slides are. I scanned at 600dpi on a Canoscan 8800F with no processing. Now I have to see if I can attach a picture. One is 20 seconds exposure and the other is 30 seconds.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by lacavol; 09-02-2012 at 02:35 AM. Click to view previous post history. Reason: attachment

  9. #9
    Rhodes's Avatar
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    The second picture looks good!



 

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