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  1. #11
    aleksmiesak's Avatar
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    Ha! That's a great tip. And I also love my Paterson tank and reels for 120. I even develop my 4x5 using taco method before I get the MOD thingy. And I also have a spare set of reals so I always have dry ones to rotate between. One thing I noticed is water likes to sit around the ball bearing and that's what may cause problems. Make sure you dry that part with a paper towel and you're good to go. Never had any major problem with them. As opposed to my failed attempts at steel. I am getting a few Hewes reels (supposed to be better) only because I inherited a bunch of steel tanks so I might as well use them. But I'm not optimistic...
    Aleksandra Miesak

    "One should really use the camera as though tomorrow you'd be stricken blind." - Dorothea Lange

  2. #12
    Sirius Glass's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by waltereegho View Post
    Don't put your plastic film reels in the microwave to dry in between runs, because they will melt. Ask me how I know...
    "Ask me how I know..." so now I am asking you. Please supply all the details!

    I use the Hewes steel reels for 135 and 120 in steel tanks for black & white processing. I rinse the steel reels and let them air dry. I have never put steel reels in the microwave nor do I plan to ever.

    The only plastic reels I use now are when I use the Jobo processor for color processing and occasionally for black & white processing. I rinse the plastic reels and let them air dry.
    Warning!! Handling a Hasselblad can be harmful to your financial well being!

    Nothing beats a great piece of glass!

    I leave the digital work for the urologists and proctologists.

  3. #13
    Patrick Robert James's Avatar
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    I melted some Jobo caps in the oven once. They turned into pretzels. Thankfully that was back when Jobo stuff could be had for pennies. I am more careful now, plus I have a whole bunch of tanks! No need to dry them right away.

  4. #14

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    I hope there wasn't too much mess in the microwave! During the reduction in popularity of darkroom work (and it was very popular at one time) I visited junkshops and house-clearances to buy tanks and reels for minimal cost. I now have enough to keep me in dry reels all day.

    Umpteen people use each sort of tank successfully, so one can just stick with what works for you (apart from in the microwave of course). It's true that the steel tanks and Jobo plastic ones take slightly less chemistry per reel than the Patersons, but the Paterson tanks fill and empty much quicker and are easier to clean. The famous "gain on the swings but lose on the roundabouts" thing.

  5. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnanian View Post
    plastic reels have ball bearings in them
    metal isn't good for microwaves, they probably arced
    and melted because the metal heated ...
    Thanks. I should have read more closely the make of the reels. So if there were no ball bearings and there are none in Jobo reels which are entirely plastic then with what little water is left on the reels insufficient heating would take place to damage the reels and a microwave would work?

    pentaxuser

  6. #16

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    Not all plastics are microwave safe. But I have no clue which, or why.

  7. #17

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    At least the water on the reels in the microwave would reach boiling point. I don't know if that would be enough to cause heat damage to the particular plastic used for the reels.

  8. #18

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    Isn't the melting point of plastic such as is used in a Jobo reel way above the melting point of water?

    pentaxuser

  9. #19

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    Hair dryer works great on plastic reels before loading. Kent

  10. #20

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    hi pentaxuser
    i don't know what kind of reels he used, maybe they didn't have metal bits in them
    but it was something to think about just the same

    some plastics become limp when warmed even with a hair dryer.
    i used to take rigid sheets of plastic and warm them to make them form
    different shapes.

    who knows what plastic reels are made of, HOT water to rinse them, and a few raps on a towel and air dry always worked for me ...
    i use metal reels for the most part, and always have more than i need ...

    - john

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