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  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pioneer View Post
    Beyond small differences between tank capacity, and small differences in loading the reels, they certainly seem to work the same. Since I have not noticed any difference in chemical use I am wondering what the other "many downsides" might be.

    All the known downsides which is why the Stainless Steel the serious choice for the serious photographer.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    Isn't the melting point of plastic such as is used in a Jobo reel way above the melting point of water?
    Do you mean boiling point of water?


    Don't try drying your sock in a microwave either!


    Steve.
    "People who say things won't work are a dime a dozen. People who figure out how to make things work are worth a fortune" - Dave Rat.

  3. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Smith View Post
    Do you mean boiling point of water?


    Don't try drying your sock in a microwave either!


    Steve.
    That's it Steve. I got confused between melting and boiling. I think it was Newton who that said liquids boil and solids melt and then won the BBC masterchef competition with his cottage pie R squared or was that Euclid?

    Anyway, am I right that a few spots of water left on a Jobo reel will boil and evaporate on the reel, leaving it dry and undamaged?

    Einstein tried to get what he thought was a simple answer to such a query on APUG but in the end became frustrated and turned his attention to Relativity as it was easier. Alas my maths and physics aren't good enough to let me do the same

    pentaxuser

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by waltereegho View Post
    Don't put your plastic film reels in the microwave to dry in between runs, because they will melt. Ask me how I know...
    Haha, I once put my Paterson tank on a windowsill to dry, just behind my microwave - that had a built-in grill function. I didn't realise just how much heat the cooling fins chucked out behind the unit... you can guess what happened to the tank. Let's just say it never processed another film!

    Cheers,
    kevs.
    testing...

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    All the known downsides which is why the Stainless Steel the serious choice for the serious photographer.
    Along with Pioneer, they are unknown to me, also. Would you care to enumerate some of them?

  6. #26

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    I won't start enumerating them.

    But the most obvious is that you can load a film on a completely wet reel.
    Beats plastic.

  7. #27

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    I won't start enumerating them.

    But the most obvious is that you can load a film on a completely wet reel.
    Beats plastic.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by NB23 View Post
    I won't start enumerating them.
    But the most obvious is that you can load a film on a completely wet reel.
    Beats plastic.
    Another plastic-versus-stainless argument.

    I prefer stainless reels because they use less chemistry (one shot), and are easier to load. Yes, easier.
    Paterson is suitable only for three-armed aliens, because one needs two hands to hold the two reels, and a third hand to hold the cartridge. Stainless is easily loaded with just two hands (by humans).

    Mark Overton

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by albada View Post
    Another plastic-versus-stainless argument.

    I prefer stainless reels because they use less chemistry (one shot), and are easier to load. Yes, easier.
    Paterson is suitable only for three-armed aliens, because one needs two hands to hold the two reels, and a third hand to hold the cartridge. Stainless is easily loaded with just two hands (by humans).

    Mark Overton
    Funny you should say that - I have two hands, years of developing experience and seem to manage well enough with plastic spirals with 120 and 35mm. In fact I've never used anything else. Here's a tip - you don't have to hold the cartridge/spool when loading a spiral...

    kevs
    testing...

  10. #30

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    and a third hand to hold the cartridge
    What cartridge, my film does not have them.

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