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  1. #11
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by PKM-25 View Post

    I have 46 rolls of the 2424 and 66 rolls of 35mm HIE left, I might be alright for a few more years if I stick with my plan of protecting the film like it is a rare gem.....which it is.
    66 rolls! Now that's just cruel! (I'm very jealous) I wish I had been able to afford more of it when it was being discontinued, but alas it was hard to justify what I did buy at that time.

    In any event, like you, I treat the film like the gem that it is, it's been frozen or refrigerated since new (but it has been moved from the UK to France to Canada (and within) and Japan (and within)). I always hand carry it on all my travels, it's always refrigerated (or in the freezer) when possible, and I always use a darkbag to change the film. That being said (and what I don't understand) the fogging is quite severe -- I don't have the standard clear rebate one usually gets with this film, it's anywhere from a mid-grey to black (to varying degrees). You can barely see the markings on the edges in some cases. But the amount of fogging is not necessarily constant over the roll -- on one roll it seems lighter over a few frames in several places in the roll, in the other two it's worse towards the end of the roll (which makes no sense if one would guess it was due to light piping). As I've mentioned before, I have shot quite a lot of this film, but I've never really had these problems with it before, despite the fact that I'm being more careful with it than ever!
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  2. #12

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    Huh, I am not so sure that is age fog, I bet it is something else although what I don't know. As far as the pinholes, I have never had those, not sure what that is either...

  3. #13
    sly
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    Years ago I had some 4x5 HIE. I had pinhole problems with the sheets I took to another city to take some photos at a family wedding. All the other sheets did not have pinholes, though other mistakes were made. They were not dust..... I've seen enough dust on 4x5 to say that these spots were uniformly too round to be dust.
    I always blamed the pinholes on the fact that that film was out of the fridge, both before exposure and after, quite a bit longer than usual.
    I don't remember ever having pinholes with 35mm. I have a handful of rolls left..... Better shoot them soon before they are completely past it.

  4. #14
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Alright, just to clarify (and for posterity's sake, in case others have a similar issue), here are a couple of scans of the fogging that I've experienced with HIE. This roll (taken at Angkor Wat in Cambodia) was the worst of the three, but I do have others from other trips in the last two years that look similar.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	HIE fogging_negative.jpg 
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ID:	56327 the negative strip Click image for larger version. 

Name:	HIE-fogging_positive.jpg 
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ID:	56328 the positive strip

    No pinholes here but definite fogging. But still printable I think.

    EDIT: looking at the close-up of the positive it makes me think that the excessive light light in on the neg has affected everything around it. With few exceptions I always use a red 25 filter (and I definitely did in this example), but obviously bracketed because I wasn't sure of the light (it wasn't as bright as it appears in the negs!). Could it be a camera issue?
    Last edited by mooseontheloose; 08-30-2012 at 09:00 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  5. #15
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    Rachelle, looking at your negative strip I can see that the fogging has extended right out to the edges of the film. As a user of HIE I have encountered fogging from time to time but not to this extent. Two possibilities occur to me 1. You could be right about it been a camera issue or 2. If your exposure was a long one, the light may have spread throughout the portion of film being exposed. If you have any shots taken out in the open you could compare them.

    As regards the pinholes I think that this can occur in HIE, I know that it has happened to me from time to time. But I have never seen it to the extent that it has occurred on your second negative.

    Since my film is way past its 'use by date' I nowadays shoot in hope that everything will be okay. But I can understand your frustration to have travelled so far and come back with a ruined film.
    Last edited by Vincent Brady; 08-31-2012 at 12:04 PM. Click to view previous post history.

  6. #16
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    And back to pinholes...

    So today I finished developing most of the rolls from that Feb/Mar trip -- not HIE, just regular HP5+ in D-76. And at least one of the rolls has pinholes in them. I know that there's some kind of myth about an acid stop causing pinholes and I never believed it, but I'm wondering if that's what's happening? Two completely different emulsions exhibiting the same kind of problem? I also came to the realization that this (week) has been the first time that I've developed film since moving into my new place (it's a house, quite a different experience to apartment living in Japan), and I'm wondering if there's something in the water that is reacting with the chemicals (or causing the chemicals to over-react) that is causing this issue.

    Once I noticed the pinholes I stopped using the acid stop full stop and have developed all subsequent rolls with just a water stop between the developer and the fix. I'll look at the negatives more closely tomorrow to see if that helped (or didn't). Hopefully it's not the water. I mix all my chemicals (stock and working solution) with distilled water, but it would become really expensive for me if I had to do every wash with distilled as well. Distilled water is not available in Japan so I buy it from an import company.

    Anyway, if anyone has any further suggestions of what might be causing this or how to fix it, I'd sure appreciate them.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by pgomena View Post
    Pinholes were a common problem with HIE.
    Second this. Bleach the spots and then retouch. You can use ticture of iodine on a sharpened toothpick to do this. Refix, wash and dry before spotting.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

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