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  1. #1
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Pinholes in my HIE?

    I've finally gotten around to developing some film taken from a trip to northern Japan/Kuala Lumpur/Cambodia earlier this year (Feb/Mar). Yes, yes, I know that it's important to develop film as soon as possible, but with limited resources it's not always possible for me, and I've never had problems with delayed processing in the past (film is always refrigerated until processed). I shot 3 of my last 4 rolls of HIE on that trip and while the content is good, the film is not -- almost all of the rolls display some degree of fogging, which I can't understand. They were definitely loaded in total darkness (and by that I mean in a changing bag in a dark room) and kept refrigerated until developed.

    Also, one of the rolls (the one with the least amount of fogging) seems to have what I think are pinholes -- the film is clear right through each of the holes, which occur over the entire film, including the rebate. Some frames have quite a few holes, others just one or two, and some not at all. Developed in D-76, with stop and fix as usual. I've developed over 30 rolls this way and have never had a problem before, but I'm wondering what could have caused it since the other two rolls developed at the same time don't exhibit this problem. Is it age of the film (exp. 2009)? Too long to have waited to develop it? The heat of SE Asia for a couple of weeks? Too many passes in the carry-on scanners at the airport? Cosmic radiation? Bad luck?

    I know it's easily fixed in photoshop, but is there any way that I might be able to print these negs traditionally to get rid of these unsightly black spots?

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    The most frustrating thing for me is, when I really didn't know what I was doing with HIE the negs look great -- including all the times I loaded the film in daylight. Now, no matter what I do, no matter how careful I am, my last and final rolls have exhibited so many different problems!
    Last edited by mooseontheloose; 08-29-2012 at 07:06 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  2. #2

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    Dust on the film in-camera perhaps?

  3. #3
    phirehouse's Avatar
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    was the film X-rayed at any point during your trip?

  4. #4
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooseontheloose View Post
    I know it's easily fixed in photoshop, but is there any way that I might be able to print these negs traditionally to get rid of these unsightly black spots?
    One trick I have heard of is to lay a clear film over the paper, and with a marker pen (Sharpie ?), ink out the offending spots. This will leave you with white areas on the final print which will then require further spotting. I've not tried this myself yet, but have a neg that requires this kind of treatment should I ever get to it. Certainly sounds like a lot less trouble than scraping or localised bleaching.

  5. #5
    mooseontheloose's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheimfluger_77 View Post
    Dust on the film in-camera perhaps?
    I suppose it's a possibility, but I don't see how. These holes also show up in the area around the sproket holes, and on the leader (that wasn't exposed), which makes me think it couldn't be a dust issue.

    phirehouse

    was the film X-rayed at any point during your trip?
    Only carry-on. In many cases I was able to get my film hand inspected, but of course I couldn't chance that with the HIE so I just sent it through the scanner. I've always thought that since infrared is at the other end of the spectrum from x-rays that it would be safer than other kinds of film. That being said, the massive amounts of fogging I'm getting on my rolls now makes me think it's travel-related (or age-related).

    paul_c5x4

    One trick I have heard of is to lay a clear film over the paper, and with a marker pen (Sharpie ?), ink out the offending spots. This will leave you with white areas on the final print which will then require further spotting. I've not tried this myself yet, but have a neg that requires this kind of treatment should I ever get to it. Certainly sounds like a lot less trouble than scraping or localised bleaching.
    That's sounds like it might work -- although then I'd really have to learn how to spot well! I guess the one benefit to the grain in HIE is that is might be a little more forgiving of spotting. Not something I'm rushing to do, but like you I think it sounds better than scraping or bleaching.
    Rachelle

    My favorite thing is to go where I've never been. D. Arbus

  6. #6
    paul_c5x4's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mooseontheloose View Post
    In many cases I was able to get my film hand inspected, but of course I couldn't chance that with the HIE so I just sent it through the scanner. I've always thought that since infrared is at the other end of the spectrum from x-rays that it would be safer than other kinds of film. That being said, the massive amounts of fogging I'm getting on my rolls now makes me think it's travel-related (or age-related).
    Much more likely the fogging is age related. Fogging induced by X-ray screening, according to a Kodak publication on the subject, will show distinctive banding. The direction of the banding being subject to the orientation of the film in relation to the x-ray source. Bearing in mind this film is well out of date, I think you are doing well to get usable images from it.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by mooseontheloose View Post
    That being said, the massive amounts of fogging I'm getting on my rolls now makes me think it's travel-related (or age-related).
    If you were to look at the negative in terms of the zone system, what zone or tone would the level of fogging be? I have a fair amount of the last batch that has been stored sub zero, since you made me a little paranoid, I compared a roll I shot in 2008 with a roll I shot a few months ago, identical base density, pretty much right in between Tri-X and HP5.
    Last edited by PKM-25; 08-29-2012 at 11:35 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

  8. #8

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    Pinholes were a common problem with HIE. I had it on one occasion. It's been so long since I've processed any that I don't remember offhand what the problem/solution might be, but I seem to remember that tight temperature controls and a more dilute stop bath or water stop bath might help.

    Peter Gomena

  9. #9

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    Infrared film is very fog-prone, that's just part of life. That's why they recommend always keeping it at cool temperature.
    For the pin holes, I had that problem occasionally with various films, and I tracked it down to the fixer going bad. I would mix 2L of working strength fixer and use that over several months. Apparently it's not a good idea. By switching to fresh mixing of the fixer I eliminated most of the pin holes.
    However, in your case I think the problem is just weak old emulsion on the HIE film. I would switch to a very weak acid or preferably water stop bath and an alkaline or near neutral fixer like TF4 or TF5.

  10. #10

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    Since my last post, I developed a roll of David Romano re-spool of 70mm Aerographic 2424 that I shot in my Hasselblad on and off from early Fall last year finishing with the Winter X-Games. When I was not shooting the roll, I double ziplock bagged the film back and stuck it in the freezer until I used it again, even the shot rolls live in the freezer....

    The film I just developed that was spooled in 2003 is absolutely perfect with no real sign of base fog just the same as 35mm HIE, about the same as HP5 overall.

    I have 46 rolls of the 2424 and 66 rolls of 35mm HIE left, I might be alright for a few more years if I stick with my plan of protecting the film like it is a rare gem.....which it is.
    Last edited by PKM-25; 08-29-2012 at 03:28 PM. Click to view previous post history.
    "I'm the freak that shoots film. God bless the freaks!" ~ Mainecoonmaniac ~

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