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  1. #21

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    Thanks Bob - it looks more and more that selenium treatment became practice in the US (and Canada obviously) already many decades ago.

    I also use strong Se to bring some life to my favourite paper (Ilford MG FB Matt).

  2. #22
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    I used Selenium toners in the 1970's but I made them up from scratch, usually IT-3 an Ilford Selenium Sulphide toner however this gives quite a strong reddish brown tone so very different to KRST.

    It was some time before I saw Kodak KRST in the UK - I'd guess in the 1980's but then my nearest trade supplier was an Ilford dealer and few people I knew used Kodak materials. We bought Kodak or Fuji colour films through the pro-labs we used but they didn't sell anything other than colour film (of all formats).

    Ian

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    David, don't you think that this is too strong of a statement? I might be wrong, but having seen "The Family of Man" exhibition in Clervaux, the last thing I wondered about was the printing technique the masters or their printers used (although, many photos seemed to be reproductions only). But then again, you might be as well right as The Land was about landscape photography where tonality and Dmax matter.


    Thanks for this interesting bit of history.
    Hi Miha,

    if anything what I wrote could be an understatement. I do not think that anyone who did not attend this exhibition (I was at the time 14) can understand what a revelation it was. It was, of course, the overall impact of the body of photographs, but the prints from Adams and Brett Weston were such a mind blowing thing to see that everything that I had learnt just flew out of the window.

    For the first time I understood what fine art printing meant. This, and the photo magazine Creative Camera, were the opening of the world for UK photographers who, like myself, hated the club scene and longed for photography to be much more than what judges wanting in 'print battles'.

    It changed my life - can I say more?

    Best,

    David
    www.dsallen.de

  4. #24

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    Hi David, I can imagine the impact of the show but fail to see the role of selenium. Toning represent but one step of a complex process of fine art printing.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by miha View Post
    Hi David, I can imagine the impact of the show but fail to see the role of selenium. Toning represent but one step of a complex process of fine art printing.
    Most of the important art photographers (UK) beginning that era cite the exhibition as being a key factor in the way photography changed in the UK. It was the first large scale exhibition of phography as an art to be seen here after WWII. Dire shortages of materials as well as equipment during and after the war had changed the way people percieved photography and the art traditions had been lost. We forget that rationing in the UK was more severe after the war as we had to send food to help feed Europe and particularly Germany, import restrictions on cameras were in force into the 1950's and the taxes on luxury goods like camera were still high until the introduction of VAT in the 1970's.

    The reality was that it was a number of factors coming together in the aerly 1970's that resurrected photography as an art in the UK and with that came the tradition of the fine print. It's also fogotten that in the UK FB papers almost died out with the introduction of Ilfospeed, Ilford had dropped their warm tone paper Ilfomar, they'd stopped selling ID-78 their WT developer.

    It was the introduction of the first premium B&W paper Galerie that tipped the blance, new importers sprang up, Peter Goldfield importing Agfa materials after they'd pulled out of the consumer B&W market, spawning Silverprint when Peter closed.

    Ian

  6. #26

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    Ian, it seems Peter Goldfield of Goldfinger imported and popularised KRST (among other things) in the UK. In his Craftbook from 1983 (there are also earlier editions of the book) he talks about it on page 55.

  7. #27
    Ian Grant's Avatar
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    Peter had worked with Minor White in the US after qualifying as a pharmacist, he had a deep knowledge of photography. I have a signed copy of his craftbook

    Ian

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Both these involved the same circle of photographers who themselves had links with the US workshop circle including Minor White & Paul Cpenegro. An article in Ten8 magazine, "Where the Wild things went" discussed the British disciples of Minor White, most were photography lecturers many heads of department at the time or later and that included John Blakemore, Paul Hill, John Davies, Thomas Joshua Cooper etc all still working today.
    Ian
    Sounds an interesting article. You wouldn't have a date or issue number for the Ten8 article so can check it out when next in the Art Library?
    Ta
    Mike

  9. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ian Grant View Post
    Peter had worked with Minor White in the US after qualifying as a pharmacist, he had a deep knowledge of photography. I have a signed copy of his craftbook

    Ian
    The book (unsigned though ) can be found on Silverprint site as a .pdf document.

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Crawford View Post
    Ian
    Sounds an interesting article. You wouldn't have a date or issue number for the Ten8 article so can check it out when next in the Art Library?
    Ta
    Mike
    I copied the article while doing my MA so you can have a copy I came across over the weekend. The Ten8 issue was called Rural Myths, I have an earler Ten8 landscape issue as well that has early Thomas Joshua Cooper, Richard Adler, John Blakemore etc work in it, possibly Pail Hill as well. The two issues show the evolution of British post war landscape photography quite well

    Even Fay Godwin went on a Paul Hill workshop when she was moving from portraits to Landscape, I may remember who was the visitingphotographer - she did tell me once.

    Ian

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