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  1. #11

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    I use a red 25a filter for almost all my black and white landscapes, but I've never had really dark skies unless under cloud or at night. I like the detail the red brings out in skies etc but I don't really like the 'black sky' look - it's too artificial for my liking. YMMV.

    Cheers,
    kevs
    testing...

  2. #12
    Poisson Du Jour's Avatar
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    A polariser with a red filter? Oh my... I would be concerned about heavily compromising the imaging integrity of the lens with that set up.
    You're in Norway, but didn't mention whether you favour the summer or winter months; I imagine winter is way too dark (and abysmally long...) and summer provides richly hued blue skies and prrrrrrrretty sunsets. Well I hope so! I'm going there in a couple of years!!
    I have traditionally used just a red filter and concentrated on that part of the sky that is darkest blue. A polariser is used when I don't have a large area of sky so as to avoid any partial polarisation. You could also hand-meter the sky and give it -2 stops or darken the sky as you see fit in the darkroom.
    “The photographer must determine how he wants the finished print to look before he exposes the negative.
    Before releasing the shutter, he must seek 'the flame of recognition,' a sense that the picture would reveal
    the greater mystery of things...more clearly than the eyes see."
    ~Edward Weston, 1922.

  3. #13
    Dave Krueger's Avatar
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    I use a red R60 filter with a polarizer on occasion to darken the sky. It admittedly looks unnatural, but looking natural is generally not that high on my list of pictorial imperatives. There is also the problem of uneven effect due to the angle of the sun, although that can sometimes be remedied by burning in the lighter part of the sky when you print he picture. I find it easier to get the black sky effect by having the main subject matter evenly lit with direct bright sunlight. It never occurred to me that it would be more difficult in the higher latitudes, but that seems to make sense.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  4. #14
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    I think the "where you are"( latitude) and the season make a big difference. The OP is in Norway but even here in the U.K. which is a little further south I have never managed black skies or even got remotely close to this effect with a polariser and a 25 red with non IR film

    OP I don't know if 7Dayshop exports to Norway but it has some very cheap filters even at the size you mention.

    pentaxuser
    Thanks for the tip. =)
    Unfortunately they only ship to the uk (I was droolling over some neopan 400 film they had, but the drooling turned into tears when I knew they didn't ship here )
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  5. #15
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    A polariser with a red filter? Oh my... I would be concerned about heavily compromising the imaging integrity of the lens with that set up.
    You're in Norway, but didn't mention whether you favour the summer or winter months; I imagine winter is way too dark (and abysmally long...) and summer provides richly hued blue skies and prrrrrrrretty sunsets. Well I hope so! I'm going there in a couple of years!!
    I've used pola + gradfilters (the square ones) on my digital camera earlier, without any ill effects, so I'm not too concerned. (the filters I have now are indeed very nice). The biggest problem is keeping the filter-stack clean and free of internal glare.
    You're right about the season, the winter is long and pretty dark (You have a few hours of "normal'ish" light in December/January between 10:00 and 15:00. I think the sunset is around 15:00 in December anyway, even in the south of Norway). A good thing about that, is that you can wrap up your average coastal landscape shoots early and be home at a reasonable time ^^ The more or less constant low sun, a long with winter haze can give the light a softer quality as well, this can be nice for outdoor portraits and such.

    I often think the summer-sky is a bit too washed out in color some times, you need to shoot in the opposite direction to get some good color in there during the day, or use a pola to bump the color a bit.
    - Sunsets are nice though, but remember that the air is often very dry and clear here, even in the summer. The sunsets with the sun in the picture tend to be pretty "sharp" until the sun hits the horizon, this creates a real need for graduated ND's to balance things.
    I often try to wait until the sun is obscured/partially obscured to even things out: http://www.helino-photo.com/p259360479

    Quote Originally Posted by Poisson Du Jour View Post
    I have traditionally used just a red filter and concentrated on that part of the sky that is darkest blue. A polariser is used when I don't have a large area of sky so as to avoid any partial polarisation. You could also hand-meter the sky and give it -2 stops or darken the sky as you see fit in the darkroom.
    Thank you for the tip =)
    Last edited by Helinophoto; 09-03-2012 at 06:56 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  6. #16
    georg16nik's Avatar
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    Filters effect vary for orthochromatic and panchromatic films.
    You need a hood along with the filter/filters in order to have repeatable results.
    If Your camera meters through the lens.. there might be surprises.
    For B&W its useful to have blue, yellow, green, orange, red, IR, polar and most importantly a hood

  7. #17
    brian steinberger's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DWThomas View Post
    Dark sky also has a lot to do with time of day, weather and direction.
    This is 95% of the answer.

    To obtain black or near black skies I need the above conditions to be just right, then it's an orange and polarizer stacked together. A red and polarizer would be even greater effect but you lose too much shadow detail. I meter through the filter stack, or if I'm in a hurry just dial in +3 stops of compensation.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Park Head Church, Pecktonville MD 8-11-12 02.jpg   Tree on Big Hill 02.jpg  

  8. #18
    Vaughn's Avatar
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    I rarely go for dark skies -- don't usually care for them.

    But I usually have a yellow with me in the Fall -- to brighten up the fall leaves...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 2_RedwoodVineMaple.jpg  
    At least with LF landscape, a bad day of photography can still be a good day of exercise.

  9. #19
    bsdunek's Avatar
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    Wouldn't leave home without my (too) many filters. One has to expirement and learn how to use them to achieve the desired results, which includes not using them.
    Bruce

    Moma don't take my Kodachrome away!
    Oops, Kodak just did!
    For all practical purposes, they've taken Kodak away.


    BruceCSdunekPhotography.zenfolio.com

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by brian steinberger View Post
    This is 95% of the answer.
    The other 5% is "Do I have the filter with me or did I forget it at home?"

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