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  1. #1
    Helinophoto's Avatar
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    Do you use filters...?

    When I am out shooting landscape with black and white film, I often bring my #25 red filter and sometimes also use a polariser with it as well, aiming for those black skies.

    However, I rarely do get black skies (only with IR-film), maybe a bit darker skies, but never black.
    - How do you obtain those pitch-black skies? Do you use a particular film?

    Also, I don't own any other color-filters (they are expensive in 77mm size), but do you guys use/recommend other filter types when one is out shooting?
    Do you use color-filters with studio lights and black and white film for example?

    With people, I prefer darker reds (lips) on the subjects.

    What is your filter-secret....? =)
    Last edited by Helinophoto; 09-02-2012 at 08:20 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    -
    "Nice picture, you must have an amazing camera."
    Visit my photography blog at: http://helino-photo.blogspot.com

  2. #2
    Blighty's Avatar
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    I will sometimes use a grey grad filter to tame a particularly bright sky. My personal choice for skyscapes is a yellow and pola.
    Norman is an island.Time and tide wait for Norman.

  3. #3
    Kevin Kehler's Avatar
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    Filters will adjust the contrast - I carry a yellow, orange, red, yellow-green and polarizer. When shooting a landscape, the yellow provide approximately the same amount of contrast as your eyes do, the orange more contrast and the red the most. However, each makes changes that you need to be aware of (a setting sun appears a lot more orange/red than a noon sun so a orange/red filter will lighten those skies somewhat as opposed to darkening a noon sun which is more blue). It is best to study colour theory and books on filters as it really does help - the question is, what you want the photo to look like and then determine the filter to use from there.

    You have also have to realize, for a lot of photographs with truly black skies, either infrared film is used or there is significant burning in the darkroom occurring. Even with a dark red filter, most films will not register a dark black sky on a straight print.
    Once a photographer is convinced that the camera can lie and that, strictly speaking, the vast majority of photographs are "camera lies," inasmuch as they tell only part of a story or tell it in a distorted form, half the battle is won. Once he has conceded that photography is not a "naturalistic" medium of rendition and that striving for "naturalism" in a photograph is futile, he can turn his attention to using a camera to make more effective pictures.

    Andreas Feininger

  4. #4
    coigach's Avatar
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    I shoot b+w reverse processed transparencies, and use ND grads all the time to balance skies and foreground, just as a colour Transparency shooter would use ND grads. See examples here:
    http://www.apug.org/gallery1/browsei...mageuser=12991

    3 stop ND Grads (hard + soft edge) are my most-used photographic tools...

  5. #5
    DWThomas's Avatar
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    I generally carry yellow, orange, green and red, the yellow probably being my most used. I have polarizers but don't use them much except for specific reflection problems (low use being embarrassing considering what they cost!) Dark sky also has a lot to do with time of day, weather and direction. I've had shots looking directly away from the sun in late afternoon on a crystal clear, low humidity day where unfiltered color shots look as though there was a polarizer used. With B&W I like yellow or occasionally orange just to bring out clouds a bit, bringing down the sky a little in the process.

  6. #6

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    I've used a #25 filter + a linear polarizer to get the "day for night" effect used in classic b&w cinematography. It works best on a clear sunny day. The result looks as if it were shot on a clear night with a bright full moon.

  7. #7

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    I used to think that white skies in landscapes were an unforgivable sin, but then I saw Cartier-Bresson's landscapes. Now I only use filters in medium format, and only very sparingly. A red #25A or #29 filter does much more than just darken the skies, it changes the entire tonal structure of the scene. More often than not I find the effect unpleasant and go for something lighter, even if that means washed out skies.
    And the sign said, "long haired freaky people need not apply"

  8. #8

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    I also use a red and a polarizer to get a very dark sky.

    Jeff

  9. #9
    Vincent Brady's Avatar
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    In Ireland I'm inclined to use an orange filter but when I was in Spain (brighter and stronger sunlight) I found that the orange filter made my skies too dark so I switched to yellow. So I guess it depends on where you are located in the world. I should say that I don't like dark skies except in IR photography.

  10. #10

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    I think the "where you are"( latitude) and the season make a big difference. The OP is in Norway but even here in the U.K. which is a little further south I have never managed black skies or even got remotely close to this effect with a polariser and a 25 red with non IR film

    OP I don't know if 7Dayshop exports to Norway but it has some very cheap filters even at the size you mention.

    pentaxuser

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