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  1. #1
    ThomHarrop's Avatar
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    What to rub on prints?

    Walter Rosenblum rubbed some kind of oil or laquer or something on his prints to make them glossy. Does anyone know what this might have been?

    Thanks.
    Pity the dyslexic agnostic insomniac who lies awake night after night wondering if there is a dog.

  2. #2
    gainer's Avatar
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    Garlic is well known to ward off evil spirits. And others as well.
    Gadget Gainer

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by gainer
    Garlic is well known to ward off evil spirits. And others as well.
    Ha! If you're having a problem with visible grain, garlic might keep your viewers at a distance too.

  4. #4

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    Paul Strand's printer, Richard Benson in article in ZoneVI Newsletter, in describing Strand's views & printing methods, states
    The most common has been gloss paper, and Strand detested this surface. He had similar feelings about any fully matte paper because this material was incapable of describing a strong black -- the backbone of his visual vocabulary. Between these extremes, though, existed many semi-matte papers, often with an artificial grain... These papers he varnished or waxed once dried, using different materials but always seeking to achieve a surface slightly more diffuse than the gloss papers.... all of his books were made by badgering the printer to put varnish in the ink
    van Huyck Photo
    "Progress is only a direction, and it's often the wrong direction"

  5. #5
    Aggie's Avatar
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    ph nuetral renniasance (sp) wax which is a micro crystaline wax is a good wax to use. If not shiny enough the first time, repeated applications will make it shiner. At least this is what happens with the stone sculptures I have done. I know light impressions carries it. Most art stores will have it as well.
    Non Digital Diva

  6. #6

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    Here it is on the Light Impressions web site:

    http://www.lightimpressionsdirect.co...23200&IID=8282

  7. #7
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    I've used Renaissance Wax on Ilford fiber and RC paper, looking for a different surface (the painter in me coming out, I guess.) I liked it best on a matte surface since I could control the sheen by density of wax and rubbing technique. The best thing about it is that it refuses fingerprints very effectively as well as giving that soft gleam that furniture makers have prized for centuries. I want to work some pigment into the wax on a set of prints I'm doing now, perhaps like a encaustic painting over the photographic image.

    We'll see...

    Whitey

  8. #8

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    Aggie,

    I can not remember if it is Jobo or Bessler that made a buffer for print waxing or it may have been the Morita Co of Japan that made one. Sort of a wax on wax off sort of thing.

    Hope this helps

    Jan Pietrzak



 

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