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  1. #1

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    Ilford PanF+ pinholes?

    Hi,
    I've just developed two rolls of Ilford PanF+ 35mm (expired in 2008) and stored in freezer most of the times (-18°C).
    I've used R09 one shot (1:50 for 11min), Tetenal Indicet (1:20) and Tetenal odourless fixer (1:5).
    I've used deionised water for all steps except the washing in which I've used tap water treated by a 5micron acquarium dirt and sand reduction filter.
    I've treated them with Tetenal Mirasol antistatic (1:400) and hung them to dry in a shower after having made a lot of steam inside the bathroom.
    I always handle the film with latex gloves and store the negatives in pergamine sleeves.
    Looking at the emulsion side at an angle, with a loupe (actually a 50mm lens) on a light table I see many very tiny circular spots all of the same sizes, even on the clear base in the space between frames.
    What is that?
    I'm unable to post examples because they're not visible with the naked eye nor I was able to scan these pinholes (?).
    The curious fact is that if I look at these spots at an angle I see them translucent (almost clear) while if I look at them perpendicular to the emulsion plane I see them black.

  2. #2

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    I've managed to take some pictures of the problem...
    http://flic.kr/p/d8y3xL here small round tiny spots can be seen in between two frames
    http://flic.kr/p/d8y3dh here basically the same tiny round spots (etched in the emulsion) can be seen emulsion side after the negative was rewashed in Tetenal Mirasol Antistatic 1:400
    http://flic.kr/p/d8y34C same as above
    http://flic.kr/p/d8y2Wm same as above
    http://flic.kr/p/d8y2Kq same as above
    http://flic.kr/p/d8y3pY same as above

  3. #3

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    Then again, in all frames where there's the sky I get numerous black spots much larger that those above, this time not etched in the emulsion, as if there's some kind of fungus growth much like as http://photo.net/black-and-white-pho...g-forum/00Y1Jf
    Last edited by Alessandro Serrao; 09-09-2012 at 06:58 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  4. #4
    MDR
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    Check your watersupply maybe it is contaminated. Do you feel the spot if touch the negatives (slighe elevation)?

    Dominik

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by MDR View Post
    Check your watersupply maybe it is contaminated. Do you feel the spot if touch the negatives (slighe elevation)?

    Dominik
    I've always used deionised water for dev, stop and fix and final rinse (wetting agent). I've only used filtered (5micron) tap water for washing.

    Yes, I feel something rough when I pass my finger on the negative. Something like etched emulsion where these spots are.

  6. #6

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    Alessandro,

    A thorny problem. All of your examples, except the first one, appear to be particulate matter on the surface. Do you use a wetting agent such as Photo-Flo? When you hold the film up to a strong light do the spots appear dark? If so it's particulate matter coming from somewhere. How dust free is your drying environment?

    If the spots transmit the backlight then the problem is in the emulsion itself. Possibly from dust on the negative during exposure, the lack of "rapping" on the tank to dislodge air bells, an acid stop bath, or QC in the manufacture. In your first example where spots are visible you appear to have an additional problem of fogging, since they are visible in the frame line.

    Over the past year I've been using a university darkroom with supplied chemistry. They don't use stop bath for film and from what I can tell this does not cause a problem when arresting development. I've never processed film that way before but I will now, that's one odor to deal with in the process. Oh, to clarify I do use a water fill/agitate/dump procedure for 3 or 4 cycles to stop development, it seems to work fine and you eliminate the CO2 bubble problem when going from an alkaline to acidic environment.

    Steve

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by scheimfluger_77 View Post
    Alessandro,

    A thorny problem. All of your examples, except the first one, appear to be particulate matter on the surface. Do you use a wetting agent such as Photo-Flo? When you hold the film up to a strong light do the spots appear dark? If so it's particulate matter coming from somewhere. How dust free is your drying environment?

    If the spots transmit the backlight then the problem is in the emulsion itself. Possibly from dust on the negative during exposure, the lack of "rapping" on the tank to dislodge air bells, an acid stop bath, or QC in the manufacture. In your first example where spots are visible you appear to have an additional problem of fogging, since they are visible in the frame line.

    Over the past year I've been using a university darkroom with supplied chemistry. They don't use stop bath for film and from what I can tell this does not cause a problem when arresting development. I've never processed film that way before but I will now, that's one odor to deal with in the process. Oh, to clarify I do use a water fill/agitate/dump procedure for 3 or 4 cycles to stop development, it seems to work fine and you eliminate the CO2 bubble problem when going from an alkaline to acidic environment.

    Steve
    I hung up my negative in the shower, after having made a lot of steam with hot water. So dust should not be the problem. Those tiny spots transmit light so they are transparent but can be feel to the touch of the finger.
    I use a citric base stop (Tetenal Indicet). I rap the tank (Paterson) on the table to dislodge air bubbles. My fixer is an odourless one (Tetenal odourless fixer). I always use these chemicals as per specs.

    Since I'm dealing with Ilford I think QC is not questionable so the problem should lean on my side (processing etc...).

    I absolutely rule out the fogging problem.

    Do those tiny spots can be traced back to how I store my films in the freezer?

  8. #8

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    I would say the problem is not storage. Try processing a few rolls using water for stop bath instead of any kind of chemical, just use tap water. Just because your past method yielded good results doesn't mean it's good for all time and eternity.

    Something in your environment has changed.

    Steve

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    These do not look like air bubbles / pinholes caused by processing. Typical air bubbles or pinholes caused by air are seen by transmitted light, not by incident light as in your examples.

    They look more like some sort of damage to the film itself, which has blown away the emulsion. This might take place if the processing solutions were too hot.

    If you see actual physical damage to the emulsion, as in craters, rough spots, or some sort of damage that you can feel with a finger, then it is either the process or the film. Since this took place on what appears to be 120 and 35mm, I suspect the process.

    PE

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    Kodak hypo clear does that.

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