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  1. #11
    Ole
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    I would certainly try a staining developer first. I have used 1 tsp pyro, 2tsp potassium carbonate in 500ml water with good results. No sulfite at all, so the developer died as I was working. But that didn't matter at all, nor did the (very) high base fog: A slightly thin negative was suitable for POP printing after this treatment!
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  2. #12
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    Well tried the intensification today with In-5, and while it worked, I observed the craziest things. One, the negative has an almost unicolor appearance to it. I see colors of yellow, amber, brown, and black. Second, and this is the kicker, if i look at the negative in front of a black or dark background, I see a positive image. I won't get a chance to print it until this evening. Has anyone observed anything like this before?
    RL Foley

  3. #13
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    The IN-5 behaves as a physical developer, meaning that it actually deposits additional silver onto the negative. Ideally, this deposit is in proportion to the original image forming silver. You have in effect used a process similar to that used to create ambrotypes in wet plate collodion, which is also a physical development process - the usual wet plate ambrotype developer is actually an acidic mixture of iron sulfate, everclear and acetic acid, and not the typical high pH developers we normally use (except for MAS amidol, which is acidic).

    The ambrotype is an underexposed overdeveloped negative that appears to be positive when placed on a black background because the silver in the highlights reflects light and the clear areas just let the black background come through, and thus appear black. I guess you could use your process to make faux film based ambrotypes if you wanted!

    Quote Originally Posted by Silverpixels5
    Well tried the intensification today with In-5, and while it worked, I observed the craziest things. One, the negative has an almost unicolor appearance to it. I see colors of yellow, amber, brown, and black. Second, and this is the kicker, if i look at the negative in front of a black or dark background, I see a positive image. I won't get a chance to print it until this evening. Has anyone observed anything like this before?

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ole
    I would certainly try a staining developer first. I have used 1 tsp pyro, 2tsp potassium carbonate in 500ml water with good results. No sulfite at all, so the developer died as I was working. But that didn't matter at all, nor did the (very) high base fog: A slightly thin negative was suitable for POP printing after this treatment!
    Speaking of base fog. The silver part of the base fog can't be any greater than the original unless, perchance, the original fixation was incomplete. The pyro adds stain to that base fog, but so will any other staining developer. You could as well use hydroquinone in carbonate solution, or catechol, as long as you leave out the sulfite. The dye colors are somewhat different, but all will bump up the contrast, especially on graded papers.
    Gadget Gainer

  5. #15
    Ole
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    Quote Originally Posted by gainer
    ... The silver part of the base fog can't be any greater than the original unless, perchance, the original fixation was incomplete. The pyro adds stain to that base fog, but so will any other staining developer. ...
    Absolutely correct. I should have written base stain instead. The whole negative is brown, but contrast is greatly enhanced.
    -- Ole Tjugen, Luddite Elitist
    Norway

  6. #16

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    bleach and redevelop

    If you give a couple of cycles of bleach and redevelopment in a staining developer and use a graded not a VC paper you will gain considerable contrast
    far beyond what selenium is likely to do.

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