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  1. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Felinik View Post
    I've shot and developed 3-4 rolls of Action 400 in Rodinal 1:100 60 minutes, it gives lots of grain, quite nice grain, but still, lots of it. I kind of liked it, creative, but nothing I am going to keep on doing. Here's a cpl of shots (not entirely perfect since the scan didn't do a lot for the grain when viewed on the screen.. they look better even printed digitally.

    http://d2bm3ljpacyxu8.cloudfront.net...00_001_006.jpg

    http://d2bm3ljpacyxu8.cloudfront.net...00_001_009.jpg
    Theses are really great. The extra grain seems more obvious in the non-focused areas than in the main subject with sharp focus. It adds a nice counterpoint to the subject. Is this a common effect with this particular use of Rodinal?

    Steve
    Last edited by scheimfluger_77; 09-12-2012 at 08:52 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jenni View Post
    I'm using VG Fiber Paper, Is it more difficult to use then graded paper? I have not been in the dark room in 20 years and my brain has muddled all my past darkroom experience into one be ball of chaos.
    Jenni,

    I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one getting back to the darkroom after a 20 year absence. What I've done is collect a library of everything relevant I could find in written works in order to bone up on the process, and then dive in with developer blazing.

    Steve

  3. #33
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    It was very encouraging to read all of this this morning. I've got two prints from yesterday that look okay but I feel I like more contrast. And I DO LOVE FB paper. the RC paper doesn't have the feeling to it that I like. I'm going to stick with what I've got and just keep practicing. Everyone here is so helpful! It's nice to have such a community of people that are more about the art then popularity.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by scheimfluger_77 View Post
    Jenni,

    I'm glad to hear I'm not the only one getting back to the darkroom after a 20 year absence. What I've done is collect a library of everything relevant I could find in written works in order to bone up on the process, and then dive in with developer blazing.

    Steve
    Steve you should see my desk right now, it's piled high with books and print outs. My husband is about ready to hire a backhoe to dig me out.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick A View Post
    Matt paper never looks as deep as glossy for blacks, it's all about light reflectance. IMO, matt looks muddy and not as crisp as glossy. It does have it's place, I like it for soft focus subjects and portraiture, when deep blacks aren't needed. I also think it's da bomb for hi-key subjects (my opinion).
    You are exactly right that is what I am seeing and I'm not crazy about it. I will try it with some hi-key subjects and see if I like it better. I only have 25 sheets of it, so maybe I'll save it for that. I have a box of 100 sheets of Ilford RC paper that a photographer gave me, I'll use that up, by then I should have a good start at understanding the printing process. The only thing I like about the RC paper is the deep blacks. To me it just feels cheep. It shouldn't because I really like Ilford products. Anyway I'll try the hi-key for sure!

  6. #36
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    I don't know how the Foma paper will respond to it (Thomas would know) but to get slightly deeper blacks on neutral toned papers you can try selenium toning. For this you usually use more dilute toner than you would for a more radical color change. Many neutral tone papers will cool slightly with a slight increase in d-max and contrast. I use Kodak selenium toner at 1+19 for somewhere around 5 minutes. With the Adox MCC 110 paper I've been using I stop at 4 minutes because 5 starts giving me too much purple eggplant color I don't really care for.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    I don't know how the Foma paper will respond to it (Thomas would know) but to get slightly deeper blacks on neutral toned papers you can try selenium toning. For this you usually use more dilute toner than you would for a more radical color change. Many neutral tone papers will cool slightly with a slight increase in d-max and contrast. I use Kodak selenium toner at 1+19 for somewhere around 5 minutes. With the Adox MCC 110 paper I've been using I stop at 4 minutes because 5 starts giving me too much purple eggplant color I don't really care for.
    Thank you for the suggestion, I am not ready to try toning prints just yet. I'm going to go back to the basics and work on getting my negatives correct and work on getting good results with the paper, once I'm good at that I'll feel brave enough to try toning. Which indecently we never did in school.

  8. #38
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    Personally I think if you're ready to print, you're ready to tone, and no print is finished until it's toned. Even if you don't want a color change, selenium and sepia toners (and gold but that's expensive) improve archival properties of the prints, and using them is quite easy. But that's just my view.

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cole View Post
    Personally I think if you're ready to print, you're ready to tone, and no print is finished until it's toned. Even if you don't want a color change, selenium and sepia toners (and gold but that's expensive) improve archival properties of the prints, and using them is quite easy. But that's just my view.
    Toning prints is not necessary to learn in order to learn how to print. It's an extra step that isn't necessary. If you really want to tone them, it can be done even a couple of years down the road.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  10. #40
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    I don't think it's necessary to "learning how to print" either. What does learning to print have to do with it? I don't consider the print finished until it's tone and personally tone all my prints. YMMV but if someone isn't satisfied with the d-max of a paper they otherwise like, dilute selenium toner is worth a try. There's really nothing to learn, just try it and see if you like the results.

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