Switch to English Language Passer en langue française Omschakelen naar Nederlandse Taal Wechseln Sie zu deutschen Sprache Passa alla lingua italiana
Members: 71,515   Posts: 1,572,075   Online: 1167
      
Page 1 of 11 1234567 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 101
  1. #1
    Jenni's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    89

    Arista Film from Freestylephoto

    I heard good things about the film. So I thought I'd give it a try with 4x5, this is a scan of the negative. I'm trying to print it with the enlarger on FB Arista paper but my dark's keep blocking and it looks a bit milky.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Annika038 small.jpg 
Views:	330 
Size:	99.4 KB 
ID:	56903

  2. #2
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,497
    Images
    299
    The Arista.Ultra EDU films are all a little bit slow compared to their rated box speed, regardless of developer. You may wish to try exposing them at about half box speed for more solid shadow detail, and clearer details in those areas.

    I found the ISO 100 to work well at EI 50, the ISO 200 well at EI 80, and the ISO 400 well at EI 160. If you use a speed enhancing developer, such as TMax or Ilfotec DD-X, you may get a bit more.

    I hope that helps! Beautiful portrait.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  3. #3
    EASmithV's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    1,877
    Blog Entries
    4
    Images
    123
    I find the 400 looks great at 400 in rodinal 1:100 for 50 minutes stand dev.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	6894914019_667a7dc1e0_z.jpg 
Views:	132 
Size:	166.7 KB 
ID:	56924
    Last edited by EASmithV; 09-11-2012 at 12:31 AM. Click to view previous post history.
    www.EASmithV.com

    "The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera."— Dorothea Lange
    http://www.flickr.com/easmithv/
    RIP Kodachrome

  4. #4
    Roger Cole's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Suburbs of Atlanta, GA USA
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    4,132
    The EDU ultra is re-branded Foma. From the results to the blue tint (at least on what I have in 120, this may have changed recently according to reports and I never got it on 4x5) to the green/blue dye that comes out in pre-soak, it's clearly Foma. Pretty nice film really if you like an old school look. I too have been shooting the 400 at EI 200 with good results, developed in D76 1+1 at about 15% less time than the spec sheet calls for.

  5. #5
    Jenni's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    89
    Thank you guys I will try shooting it at half box speed. I currently have d76. When I run out I want to try some other types and find my own style. I do want to try stand developing but read its not ideal for printing. Anyone have experience to the contrary?

  6. #6
    Rick A's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    north central Pa
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    6,173
    Images
    34
    I shoot Foma and Arista EDU Ultra branded and found that half listed speed in any developer works very well. I have it in 135, 120, and 4x5 formats. My favorite film/dev combo for 4x5 is 100 speed shot @ 50iso in Pyrocat-HD, 1+1+100 for 15mins @ 20c, normal agitation.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum

  7. #7

    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    35mm
    Posts
    428
    I shoot a lot of Fomapan Action 400 35mm, and just started souping in Fomadon LQN (1+10 in 11 minutes) looks just amazingly great (no scans yet).

    I shoot EI320 after reading the charts from FOMA (last page in the pdf).

    http://www.digitaltruth.com/products...omapan_400.pdf
    http://street-photos.net/ | http://felinik.com/ | http://www.facebook.com/jf.felinik

    "The one with the most stuff when he dies wins"

  8. #8
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,497
    Images
    299
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenni View Post
    Thank you guys I will try shooting it at half box speed. I currently have d76. When I run out I want to try some other types and find my own style. I do want to try stand developing but read its not ideal for printing. Anyone have experience to the contrary?
    I don't think standing development lends much to the Foma films, honestly, but that's just my flavor. Standing development is a pretty extreme form of compensating development, and has its uses and strengths, for sure.
    For me, with Foma films I find that the highlights become a bit dull this way, and I prefer intense highlights. The best results I've had with Foma, on the Ilford paper I like to use, is with Edwal 12, a developer that yields brilliant and intense highlights. That gives me the sparkle I desire in the highlights, which to me is one of the best aspects of these films.

    But test it for yourself, and print the negs to see how you like it. Compare it to regular development on the same shots. Make contact sheets of the negatives side by side to see the difference. It will tell you a lot.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

  9. #9
    Jenni's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Bertilsson View Post

    But test it for yourself, and print the negs to see how you like it. Compare it to regular development on the same shots. Make contact sheets of the negatives side by side to see the difference. It will tell you a lot.
    I feel like a geeky doctor always testing, but I wouldn't have it any other way. It's a lot of fun and ALL of you have so much incite thank you for sharing. Now if I could just figure out how to get a proper contact print from the negatives, I feel my testing would be that much better.

  10. #10
    Thomas Bertilsson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    Minnesota
    Shooter
    Multi Format
    Posts
    14,497
    Images
    299
    Quote Originally Posted by Jenni View Post
    I feel like a geeky doctor always testing, but I wouldn't have it any other way. It's a lot of fun and ALL of you have so much incite thank you for sharing. Now if I could just figure out how to get a proper contact print from the negatives, I feel my testing would be that much better.
    Contact printing is like a luxury compared to enlarging. For my own film and developing testing I use a contact printing frame, but a sheet of glass and a flat surface will do nicely. You lay a piece of photo paper with emulsion side up, put your negatives on top with their emulsion side down, and then you 'close the lid'. If you use a sheet of glass I recommend taping the edges with tape so you don't cut yourself. Put pressure on the glass to hold paper and negatives in close contact, and avoid blocking the light. You can use weights if you need to use your hands.
    Make a test strip to determine exposure time, and start making contact sheets. The exposure time that gives you maximum black of the paper in the film rebate is usually the best exposure. Then you either adjust contrast grade of the printing paper, or you adjust developing time of your negative to get the contrast you need out of the print. I always make my contact prints at Grade 2.5, and adjust film exposure and developing time to have negatives that print reasonably well as a straight print at that contrast.
    Then when I start making individual prints of single negatives I of course tweak the print into what I want the finished print to look like, but I find the approach above gives me the best starting point to get to a finished print, with minimal time spent and minimal waste.

    And keep practicing. Your picture above is really nice, so I think you are well on your way. You just have to remember that your paper and paper developer has a certain range, and your negative exposure and development time are variables that you alter to fit the paper and paper developer. If you learn how this system works, it will be much easier to make negatives that print like a dream without much darkroom gymnastics.
    "Often moments come looking for us". - Robert Frank

    "Make good art!" - Neil Gaiman

    "...the heart and mind are the true lens of the camera". - Yousuf Karsh

Page 1 of 11 1234567 ... LastLast


 

APUG PARTNERS EQUALLY FUNDING OUR COMMUNITY:



Contact Us  |  Support Us!  |  Advertise  |  Site Terms  |  Archive  —   Search  |  Mobile Device Access  |  RSS  |  Facebook  |  Linkedin