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  1. #1

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    Fogged and purple tinted Kodak TMY-2 400

    Hi everyone.

    I developed two rolls of Kodak Tmax 400 last night. They both came out fogged down the middle as a result of persistent emulsion and with a serious purple tint. The tint was not slight, but severe. I have developed several rolls without any issue, the only variable this time was the fixer. I used the following procedure:

    2 minute pre-soak
    Kodak HC-110(b) @ 20°
    Ilford Stop @ 20°
    Rollei RXA 1+9 for 6 minutes @ 20°
    5 X 20 turns rinse then a further 5 minutes open running rinse
    +- 30 seconds in 1:100 Wetting agent

    I never bothered trying another fix. I read another thread here that states a pre soak is a waste of time and a second fix can solve the problem. I also read that the purple hue is not problematic, however this was severe purple hue with a thicker streak of fog running down the middle of the roll (120).

    With the pre-soak, the soak comes out dark blue. Could there be a residual dye in the mix? I have developed a few rolls of Kodak normally using Ilford Rapid fix instead of the Rollei RXA. Could it be the fixer?

    Thanks for the input.
    Last edited by Ghostman; 09-14-2012 at 09:45 AM. Click to view previous post history.

  2. #2
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Possibly spent fixer, try refixing with fresh chems. In the meantime, try not to leave the negs exposed to too much light, just in case.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  3. #3

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    The fixer was a fresh bottle, opened recently and only used once before. It still smells like acetic acid. The negs have been in clear holders on my desk all day. Do you think it's still worth a second attempt at fixing. Out of interest, what does exposure to light do to the already fixed negs?

    Also, what kind of agitation does fixing require, if any? I normally give 2 or three turns during the fixing process. Could the fogged streak have been a result of not enough spacing between the roll in the spindle? I don't think so as it happened to both rolls in two different canisters leading me to believe it's a chemical issue.

  4. #4

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    I've never used this "Rollei RXA" fixer so I can't comment on that specifically. But 4-5 minutes in fresh Ilford Rapid Fix is all you need - with good agitation. Agitation during fixing is very important and often neglected. 30 seconds to 1 minute initial agitation followed by 5-10 seconds each 30 seconds thereafter is a reasonable agitation scheme for fixing.

    I would not use a second fix strictly to remove dyes. That simply leads to overfixing. The dyes will come out in the wash, and if the dyes are stubborn, let the film soak a few times in the wash for a couple of minutes. This works with or without a pre-soak.

  5. #5
    Rick A's Avatar
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    Couldn't hurt anything. You should treat fixer like it's developer for agitation. It definitly believe it's a chemical issue, not bad film.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  6. #6

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    Thanks everyone. I see that I have already been making a mistake by not agitating during fixing. I was fixing and gently turning once or twice in 5-6 minutes.

    I also think I'll just go back to Hypam or Rapid Fix.

  7. #7
    Rick A's Avatar
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    I like Eco-Pro Clearfix Neutral, alkaline fixer, works quickly and removes the purple dye in half the time as any other brand I've tried including Formulary TF-4, and is compatable with Pyro devs.
    Rick A
    Argentum aevum
    BTW: the big kid in my avatar is my hero, my son, who proudly serves us in the Navy. "SALUTE"

  8. #8

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    "I developed two rolls of Kodak Tmax 400 last night. They both came out fogged down the middle as a result of persistent emulsion and with a serious purple tint. The tint was not slight, but severe."

    Both these observations indicated that the film was not suffieciently fixed.
    A rock pile ceases to be a rock pile the moment a single man contemplates it, bearing within him the image of a cathedral.

    ~Antoine de Saint-Exupery

  9. #9

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    TMAX is well known to exhaust fixer quickly, and personally I find fresh fixer is needed to fix them properly, and two bath fixing helps these greatly!
    Refix and post bac with your results.

  10. #10

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    Looking at this page: http://www.mahn.net/DL_MAHN/RXA11.pdf, you used the paper dilution (1+9) for film. Especially for T-MAX films, you would want to use the lowest film dilution, 1+4.

    Fix it for 15 more minutes in the 1+9, and it should clear. Then use that fixer only for paper, and mix a proper batch for film.

    You should test the strength of any fixer for film. Put a piece of the leader in the fix, agitate normally, and see how long it takes to turn clear. Fix for twice that time. When the reused fixer takes twice as long to clear film as when it was new, it's exhausted.

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