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  1. #1

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    Question on RC paper

    I was given a stack of boxes of RC paper. Stacked up, it would reach my waist line. 16x20 down to 5x7. Most is outdated. I spent a couple of days testing each box for fogging( by standard developing)and found a couple packs was fogged. I think all that was fogged was boxes that had been opened.

    Other than standard printing and developing, is there anything I can do with them, like an alternative process???

    I have played with Caffenol on film and had good results.

    Can I tone RC? I do have Sepia toner that was also given at the same time.
    I don't want to spend a whole day in the darkroom trying something if it won't work at all with RC.
    I'm not lazy but I do want to try something different if it will work with this paper.
    I have printed a bunch from them using old negatives I have had for years and they look very good.

    Anyone with a knowledge base on RC paper that have used an alternative process would be appreciated.

    Any ideas????

    Thanks
    Richard

  2. #2
    eddie's Avatar
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    If the fogging isn't too bad, a bit of benzotriazole , in the developer, can help.
    Every RC paper I've used tones, although I rarely print on RC. My experience is mostly with Ilford products.

  3. #3
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    Don't judge the box based on the top sheet alone. For some reason the top sheet often performs differently than the rest of the box when a box is left alone for a long time.

    Consider lith printing, if you have the time.

    For the bigger shets, consider overprinting (ie deeper tones than normal) and bleaching the fog and overexposure back using ferricyanide bleaching.
    my real name, imagine that.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by eddie View Post
    If the fogging isn't too bad, a bit of benzotriazole , in the developer, can help.
    Every RC paper I've used tones, although I rarely print on RC. My experience is mostly with Ilford products.

    Hey Eddie

    Years ago, I never liked RC but since I have so much now, I would like to use it. I've printed about all I can with old negatives over the years.

    I like the old brown look and I think I'll mix up a pack of sepia toner today and play with that. It seems like I remember RC would tone a little but it has been a long time. I can remember when RC was first introduced on the market. Can't remember who the first mfg. was but it was advertised as being the best thing since sliced bread.



    There was only a couple of short boxes that was fogged and since I have so much, it wouldn't be worth the time to fix it.

    Thanks

    Richard

  5. #5

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    Yes, you can tone RC paper. Paper base has nothing to do with emulsion's response to toning agents. Many neutral paper, RC or FB do not accept toning very well though. You'll just have to test and see if your particular brand/type is one of them.

    What brand/type do you have?
    Develop, stop, fix.... wait.... where's my film?

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Wilde View Post
    Don't judge the box based on the top sheet alone. For some reason the top sheet often performs differently than the rest of the box when a box is left alone for a long time.

    Consider lith printing, if you have the time.

    For the bigger shets, consider overprinting (ie deeper tones than normal) and bleaching the fog and overexposure back using ferricyanide bleaching.
    Hey Mike
    I have been close to pushing the button on ordering Lith developer but I have never used it and not much use in getting some for a paper that I don't know would work for it.

    I have so much RC paper now, that I think I'll order some and try it. I have wanted to try lith style and I think I would dedicate my darkroom just for that, if I knew it would work with RC. I have done some research on lith and I understand it for FB paper but haven't heard very little about RC with it.

    The fogged stuff was in short numbers in a couple of boxes. Not worth the effort with what was left.

    Thanks
    Richard

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by tkamiya View Post
    Yes, you can tone RC paper. Paper base has nothing to do with emulsion's response to toning agents. Many neutral paper, RC or FB do not accept toning very well though. You'll just have to test and see if your particular brand/type is one of them.

    What brand/type do you have?
    Hey
    What I have is Kodabromide ll, old Arista, Ultrafine ( no idea of who made this ), Ilford Multigrade lll, Kodak Polycontrast. All in various sizes. About 1/2 is graded, other variable contrast.

    I'll mix up some Sepia today and play with that since that is the only toner I have at the present time.
    It's been so many years since I've toned anything, I couldn't remember if RC was capable or not.

    Thanks
    Richard

  8. #8

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    It is good that there is so little fogging but have you tried printing with the Ilford MGIII? MGIII is now very old and some I was given had little or no fog but had lost quite a bit of contrast.

    The effect was to give a different look which was fine for some prints but certainly if a neg had required a higher contrast then I would have had a problem.

    pentaxuser

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by pentaxuser View Post
    It is good that there is so little fogging but have you tried printing with the Ilford MGIII? MGIII is now very old and some I was given had little or no fog but had lost quite a bit of contrast.

    The effect was to give a different look which was fine for some prints but certainly if a neg had required a higher contrast then I would have had a problem.

    pentaxuser
    Hey pentaxuser

    I just looked at the boxes, 11x14 and 8x10, and the notes I had written on the boxes. Both boxes showed good. I didn't note any contrast change. I don't think I could tell if there was a change since I don't have any to compare with.

    I just today mixed up some Sepia toner and put a few prints that I had printed, and they looked very good as far as toning. I used a couple of prints from Ultrafine ( no idea whose paper ) and they came out a chocolate brown. Nice, since I like that tone. I also toned some fiber Adox MCC 110 that I had just recently bought. I didn't care for the color of those
    with Sepia toner.

    I'll try the Ilford stuff tomorrow and see how that works out.

    Richard

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RichardH View Post
    Other than standard printing and developing, is there anything I can do with them, like an alternative process???

    Any ideas????

    Thanks
    Richard
    There are loads of things you can do with this paper. The first that comes to mind is lumen printing. Check out the alternative photography site. You could also fog them, develop to black and draw on the emulsion and then reverse them, or how about using them as photogram and pinhole material.

    “The contemplation of things as they are, without error or confusion, without substitution or imposture, is in itself a nobler thing than a whole harvest of invention”

    Francis Bacon

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